RULES OF AMATEUR STATUS

1938 (R&A) * 1947-49 (USGA) * 1950 (R&A) * 1952 * 1954 * 1956 * 1960 * 1964 * 1968-70 * 1972 * 1976 * 1980 * 1984 * 1988 * 1992-96 * 2000 * 2004 * 2008

In 1878 John Ball finished in the top 5 in the Open Championship and accepted a small monetary prize. This incident was brought up when he won the Amateur Championship in 1890. At the time an amateur was one who did not play for prize money, or was an equipment maker, teacher, caddie, course architect or greenkeeper. It was eventually decided not to disqualify him.

Francis Ouimet, winner of the US Open in 1913, was declared an professional in 1916 because he part-owned a sports store - the USGA at time considered a professional was one who was 'engaged in any business concerned with golf'. He was reinstated a year later, going on to be a Walker Cup Captain, Secretary, and Vice-President of the USGA, and honorary member of the R&A.

The first Rules of Amateur Status to be included in the Rules appeared in 1947 (USGA) and 1950 (R&A). However, definitons of professional and amateur appeared in 1930 USGA and, once, in 1938 (R&A)




R&A 1938

Definitions
Professional

A professional golfer is any player who has played for a money prize or has received payment for playing or teaching the Game.
NOTE: The Championship Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews rules that the following come within this definition:
Those who teach golf for remuneration, either by personal demonstration, or by lecturing, or by allowing themselves to be filmed.

Amateurs
The following shall not be eligible to play in any Amateur Competition:
(1) Professional Golfers
(2)Those who have carried clubs for hire after attaining the age of 18 years
(3) Those who exploit their skill at the Game or allow their skill to be exploited for profit

NOTE: The following are examples of those who would come within the provisions of clause 3:
(a) Those who for remuneration allow their name or likenesses to be used for the advertisement or sale of any goods, except in the usual course of their business as dealers in or manufacturers or inventors of such goods.
(b) Those who for remuneration permit their name to be advertised or published as authors of books or articles on golf of which they are not actually the authors.
(c) Those who for remuneration and under their own names or under a description from which they can be recognised, report a golf competition or match in which they are taking part, if journalism is not their usual and recognised vocation.
(d) Those who either accept as presents, or are given facilities to buy at prices below those usually charged, golf balls, golf clubs, or other merchandise, when such presents are made or facilities granted for the purpose of advertisement.
(e) Those who, being employed by firms, companies or individuals interested in the manufacture or sale of golfing goods, play in Golf Tournaments or Competitions with the object of furthering their employer's interests.



USGA, 1947-1949

Section 1
Definition of an Amateur Golfer

An amateur golfer is one who plays the game solely as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport.

Section 2
Examples of Forfeiture of Amateur Status.

The following are among examples of acts which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and causes forfeiture of amateur status:
At any Age
A-1. Prize Money

Playing in a match, tournament or exhibition with the intention or hope of accepting money or its equivalent as a prize or compensation.
A-2. Other Prizes and Testimonials.
Accepting of a prize or testimonial of the following character (this applies to total prizes received for any one event or series of events in any one tournament):

(a) Of retail value exceeding $100
(b) Of a nature making it readily convertible into money.
Exemptions: Exempt from the above Rules are:
(1) Prizes of only symbolic value (such as metal trophies)
(2) Scholarships won as prizes in recognised golf competitions before the 18th birthday even though the period of such scholarships may extend beyond the 18th birthday.

B. After the 18th Birthday
B-1. Professionalism, General.

Receiving compensation for serving as:

(a) A professional golfer.
(b) An assistant to a professional golfer.
(c) An employee engaged in making, repairing or cleaning clubs in a golf shop at a golf course.
B-2. Instruction.
Receiving compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstration, to either individuals or groups. (This includes faculty members or other employees of institutions of learning, regardless of how incidental the giving of golf instruction may be).
B-3. Lending Name or Likeness.
Receiving or contracting to receive compensation or personal benefit for lending one's name or likeness as a golfer for the advertisement or sale of anything except in the normal course of business as a dealer, manufacturer, or inventor.
B-4. Relations with Golf Goods Dealers.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving compensation directly or indirectly from anyone dealing in golf merchandise.

Added 1948:

B-5. Golf Equipment. Accepting without appropriate payment golf balls, clubs, or other golf merchandise from anyone dealing in golf merchandise.
B-6. "Ghost Writing". Receiving or contracting to receive compensation for allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which he is not actually the author. (See Also B-2).
B-7. Membership and Privileges. Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting membership or privileges in a club or at a golf course without appropriate payment, unless such membership or privileges have been awarded as purely and deservedly honorary and in recognition of an outstanding performance or contribution to golf.
B-8. Expenses. Accepting payments, in money or otherwise, in connection with a golf competition or exhibition (except from one on whom the player is normally dependent).
Exemptions. - A reasonable amount of expenses may be accepted in the following specefic instances only:
(1) As a member of the Walker Cup Team, but such expenses may be accepted from only the USGA.
(2) As a member of the Curtis Cup Team, but such expenses may be accepted from only the USGA.
(3) As a qualified contestant in the USGA Amateur Public Links Championship proper, but only within limits fixed by the USGA.
(4) As a representative of a recognised institution of learning or of a branch of the military service and competing under the auspices of such institutions or service.
B-9. Proselyting and Athletic Scholarships. Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or any other consideration as an inducement to be a student in an institution of learning. (See A-2, exemption 2).

C. After the 21st Birthday

Caddie, Caddie-Master
Receiving compensation for serving as:
(a) A Caddie
(c)An assistant caddie-master

Section 3
Reinstatement to Amateur Status.

Each application for reinstatement to Amateur status shall be considered on its own merits. The Executive Committee of the United States Golf Association reserves the right to approve or to disapprove any application in its discretion.
Among the principles which will guide the governing body are:
A. Five Year Limit. A player shall not be eligible for reinstatement if he has been a recognised professional through a calendar period of five years or more.
B. One Reinstatement. A player may not be reinstated more than once.
C. Probationary Period. An applicant shall not be eligible for reinstatement until a probationary period of two consecutive years has elapsed from the date of his last violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer. During the probationary period the applicant shall conduct himself at all times in accordance with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer.
D. Form of Application. Each application for reinstatement shall be prepared, in duplicate, on forms provided by the United States Golf Association.
The application must be filed through, and endorsed by, a recognised sectional amateur golf association in whose district the applicant resides.
The application must be accompanied by:

(1) Statements by the applicant's former employers in golf (if available) testifying to the nature of his golf employment and the time spent therein.
(2)Additional statements from four responsible persons testifying to the reputation of the applicant and, within their knowledge, the accuracy of the applicant's statements.




1950, 1952

Definition
The amateur golfer is one who plays the game solely as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport or pastime.

Players not eligible for Amateur Status
The following shall not be eligible to play in any Amateur Competitions:-
(1) Those who have competed in any golf competition for a money prize, or have received payment, either directly or indirectly, for playing the game.
(2) Those who teach golf for remuneration.
Exception. - Teachers of physical training or other subjects whose duties include instruction in games to pupils of a recognised educational establishment.
(3) Those who have been apprenticed to a professional golfer, or who have carried clubs regularly for hire after reaching the age of 21 years.
(4) Those who accept payment, directly or indirectly, towards the expense (including hotel and travelling expenses) incurred while playing in any golf competition.
Exception. - players may receive their travelling and hotel expenses when representing their country, county, club or similar body, in team matches, when such expenses are paid by the body they represent; or by the body controlling golf in the territory they are visiting.
(5) Those who receive payment, directly or indirectly, for allowing themselves as golfing personalities to be used in any way for advertisement for the sale of goods, whether used in or appertaining to golf or not.
Exception. - Advertisements customary to the business of such players containing no reference to the game of golf or to the player's skill as a golfer.
(6) Those who, while playing, practising or demonstrating golf, allow themselves to be photographed or filmed for monetary or other reward or advertisement.
(7) Those who receive payment, directly or indirectly, for books or articles on golf of which they are not the true authors.
(8) Those who accept goods or articles, including clothes, used in or appertaining to golf, free or at reduced prices, when such gifts or reductions in prices are made either as samples or otherwise for the purpose of advertisement.
(9) Those who, being employed by firms, companies, or individuals, play in golf tournaments or competitions or exhibition matches with the object of furthering their employers’ interests.

Notes on Amateur Status Regulations
(1) A Club may elect to its membership any golfer who has forfeited his amateur status, and such election shall not affect the amateur status of the other members of that Club.

(2) All applications for reinstatement, cases which are doubtful, or those which are not covered by the above regulations, shall be submitted to the Championship Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews, whose decision shall be final.
Applications made in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales should be transmitted through the County Union to the Country Union for remarks, who in turn will forward then to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews.
Requests for reinstatement to Amateur Status should give the following particulars:-
(a) Age to date.
(b) Age at which applicant took up Professional Golf.
(c) Number of years employed in this capacity.
(d) At which Clubs employed and by whom.
(e) Present occupation.

(3) Every application will be considered on its own merits but in the case of applications for reinstatement to amateur status the following will be the guiding principles:
(i). Players may not be reinstated more than ONCE.
(ii). Any applicant for reinstatement must have acted so as to come within the definition of an amateur golfer for a period of three years immediately preceding the date of the application.
(iii). A player who has acted for five years or more so as to come within the definition of a professional golfer shall NOT normally be eligible for reinstatement.



1954, 1956, 1960

Definition
An amateur golfer is one who plays the game solely as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport or pastime.

RULE 1.
Forfeiture of Amateur Status at any age

The following are among examples of acts at any age which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of Amateur status:
1. Playing for Prize Money. Playing in a match, tournament or exhibition with the intention or hope of accepting, either directly or indirectly, money or its equivalent as a prize, testimonial or compensation.
2. Other Prizes and Testimonials. Acceptance of a prize or testimonial of the following character (this applies to total prizes received for any one event or series of events in any one tournament):
(a) Of retail value exceeding 30
(b) Of a nature making it readily convertible into money.
Exceptions.
(a) Prizes of only symbolic value (such as metal trophies).
(b) Scholarships won as prizes in recognised golf competitions before the 18th birthday, even though the period of such scholarships may extend beyond the 18th birthday.

RULE 2.
Forfeiture of Amateur Status after the 18th Birthday.

The following are among examples of acts after one's 18th birthday which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of Amateur status:
1. Professionalism. Receiving payment and award for serving as:
(a) A professional golfer.
(b) An apprentice or assistant to a professional golfer.
Exception:
Those who are engaged solely in the making, repairing, cleaning or sale of golf clubs or equipment whether at a professional's shop or not.
2. Professional Intent. Taking any action which clearly indicates the intention of becoming a professional golfer.
3. Instruction. Receiving compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exception:
Teachers of physical training or other subjects whose duties include instruction in games to pupils of a recognised educational establishment.
4. Lending Name or Likeness. Receiving or contracting to receive compensation or personal benefit directly or indirectly for allowing one's name or likeness as a golfing personality to be used in any way for advertisement or sale of anything or for monetary or other reward, whether used in or appertaining to golf or not.
Exception. - Advertisements customary to the business of such players containing no reference to the game of golf or to the player's skill as a golfer.
5. Relations with Golf Goods Dealers. Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving compensation, directly or indirectly, from anyone dealing in golf merchandise.
6. Golf Equipment. Accepting golf balls, clubs, or other golf merchandise without payment of current market price.
7. "Ghost Writing". Receiving or contracting to receive compensation, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which he is not the actual author. (See Rule 2-3).
8. Membership and privileges. Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting membership or privileges in a club or at a golf course without appropriate payment, unless such membership or privileges have been awarded as purely and deservedly honorary and in recognition of an outstanding performance or contribution to golf.
9. Expenses. Accepting payments, either directly or indirectly, towards the expense (including hotel and travelling expenses) incurred while playing in any golf competition (except from one on whom the player is normally dependent).
Exception. - players may receive their travelling and hotel expenses when representing their country, county, club or similar body, in team matches, when such expenses are paid by the body they represent, or by the body controlling golf in the territory they are visiting.
10. Athletic Scholarships. Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or any other consideration as an inducement to be a student in an institution of learning. (See Rule 1, Exception 2b).

RULE 3
Forfeiture of Amateur Status after the 21st Birthday

The following is an example of an act which violates the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and causes forfeiture of Amateur status after one's 21st birthday.
Caddie. Receiving compensation for serving regularly as a caddie.
Note: The word "regularly" denotes one who carries golf clubs as his main or substantial source of income.

RULE 4.
Reinstatement to Amateur Status

Each application for reinstatement to Amateur status shall be considered on its own merits. The Executive Committee of the Governing Body concerned reserves the right to approve or to disapprove any application in its discretion.
Among the principles which will guide the governing body are:
1. One Reinstatement. A players may not be reinstated more than once.
2. Five Year limit. A player who has acted for five years or more so as to come within the definition of a professional golfer shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement.
3. Probationary Period. No applicant shall be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself for a period of two years in accordance with the definition of an amateur golfer since the date of the last violation of that definition.
The Executive Committee, however, reserve the right to extend or shorten this period.

Form of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club
Each application for reinstatement which is doubtful or which is not covered by the above regulations shall be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, whose decision shall be final. Applications made in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales should be transmitted through the County Union to the Country Union for remarks, who in turn will forward them to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. They will then be submitted to the Professional Golfers' Association for comments.
Applications made elsewhere in countries under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club should be transmitted through the Governing Body of Golf in that country. Requests for reinstatement to Amateur Status should give the following particulars:
(a) Date of birth.
(b) Date at which applicant took up Professional Golf.
(c) At which Clubs employed and by whom.
(d) Date ceased to take part in Professional Golf
(e) Present occupation.
(f) Whether at any time a member of the Professional Golfers' Association.



1964

Definition
An amateur golfer is one who plays the game solely as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport or pastime.

RULE 1.
Forfeiture of Amateur Status at any age

The following are among examples of acts at any age which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of Amateur status:
1. Playing for Prize Money. Playing in a match, tournament or exhibition with the intention or hope of accepting, either directly or indirectly, money or its equivalent as a prize, testimonial or compensation.
2. Other Prizes and Testimonials. Acceptance of a prize or testimonial of the following character (this applies to total prizes received for any one event or series of events in any one tournament):
(a) Of retail value exceeding 50
(B) Of a nature making it readily convertible into money.
Exceptions.
(a) Prizes of only symbolic value (such as metal trophies).
(b) Scholarships won as prizes in recognised golf competitions before the 18th birthday, even though the period of such scholarships may extend beyond the 18th birthday.

RULE 2.
Forfeiture of Amateur Status after the 18th Birthday.

The following are among examples of acts after one's 18th birthday which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of Amateur status:
1. Professionalism.  Receiving payment and award for serving as:
(a) A professional golfer.
(b) An apprentice or assistant to a professional golfer.
2. Professional Intent.  Taking any action which clearly indicates the intention of becoming a professional golfer.
3. Instruction.  Receiving compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exception:
Teachers of physical training or other subjects whose duties include instruction in games to pupils of a recognised educational establishment.
4. Lending Name or Likeness.  Receiving or contracting to receive compensation or personal benefit directly or indirectly for allowing one's name or likeness as a golfing personality to be used in any way for advertisement or sale of anything or for monetary or other reward, whether used in or appertaining to golf or not.
Exception. - Advertisements customary to the business of such players containing no reference to the game of golf or to the player's skill as a golfer.
5. Relations with Golf Goods Dealers.  Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving compensation, directly or indirectly, from anyone dealing in golf merchandise.
6. Golf Equipment.  Accepting golf balls, clubs, or other golf merchandise without payment of current market price.
7. Personal Appearance.  Because of golf skill or golf reputation accepting compensation, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance whether or not in connection with a golf competition or exhibition. (This includes appearance on radio and television broadcasts.)
8. "Ghost Writing".  Receiving or contracting to receive compensation, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which he is not actually the author. (See Rule 2-3).
9. Membership and privileges.  Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting membership or privileges in a club or at a golf course without appropriate payment, unless such membership or privileges have been awarded as purely and deservedly honorary and in recognition of an outstanding performance or contribution to golf.
10. Expenses.   Accepting payments, in money or otherwise, from any source other than one on which the player is normally or legally dependent, to engage in:
(a) A golf competition or exhibition.
(b) A personal appearance as a golfer including radio and television broadcasts.
Exception. - players may receive their travelling and hotel expenses when representing their country, county, club or similar body in team matches, when such expenses are paid by the body they represent or by the body controlling golf in the territory they are visiting.
Note 1. A player is not considered to be "normally or legally dependent" upon an employer, a partner or other vocational source and acceptance of expenses therefrom is not permitted.
Note 2. Business Expenses. It is permitted to play in a golf competition while on a business trip with expenses paid provided that the golf part of the expense is borne personally and is not charged to the business. Further, the business involved must be actual and not merely a subterfuge for legitimising expenses when the primary purpose is a golf competition.
11. Athletic Scholarships.  Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or any other consideration as an inducement to be a student in an institution of learning. (See Rule 1-2, Exception b).

RULE 3.
Forfeiture of Amateur Status after the 21st Birthday

The following is an example of an act which violates the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and causes forfeiture of Amateur status after one's 21st birthday.
Caddie. Receiving compensation for serving regularly as a caddie.
Note: The word "regularly" denotes one who carries golf clubs as his main or substantial source of income.

RULE 4.
Procedure for Enforcement and Reinstatement
1. Decision on Violation

Whenever information of a possible violation of the definition of an Amateur Golfer by a player claiming to be an amateur shall come to the attention of the Executive Committee of the Governing body, the Committee, after such investigation as it may deem desirable, shall decide whether a violation has occurred. Each case shall be considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final.
2. Enforcement
Upon a decision that a player has violated the definition of an Amateur Golfer, the Committee may declare the Amateur Status of the player forfeited or require the player to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his Amateur Status.
3. Reinstatement
The Committee shall have the sole power to reinstate a player to Amateur Status or to deny reinstatement. Each application for reinstatement to shall be decided on its own merits.

Among the principles which will guide the governing body are:
1. One Reinstatement. A players may not be reinstated more than once.
2. Five Year limit. A player who has acted for five years or more so as to come within the definition of a professional golfer shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement.
3. Probationary Period. No applicant shall be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself for a period of two years in accordance with the definition of an Amateur Golfer since the date of the last violation of that definition.
The Executive Committee, however, reserve the right to extend or shorten this period.

Form of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club
Each application for reinstatement which is doubtful or which is not covered by the above regulations shall be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, whose decision shall be final. Applications made in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales should be transmitted through the County Union to the Country Union for remarks, who in turn will forward them to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. They will then be submitted to the Professional Golfers' Association for comments.
Applications made elsewhere in countries under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club should be transmitted through the Governing Body of Golf in that country. Requests for reinstatement to Amateur Status should give the following particulars:
(a) Date of birth.
(b) Date at which applicant took up Professional Golf.
(c) At which Clubs employed and by whom.
(d) Date ceased to take part in Professional Golf
(e) Present occupation.
(f) Whether at any time a member of the Professional Golfers' Association.



1968, 1970, 1972

Any person who considers that any action he is proposing to take might endanger his Amateur Status should submit particulars to the Committee for consideration.

DEFINITION OF AN AMATEUR GOLFER
An amateur golfer is one who plays the game solely as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport.

RULE 1

FORFEITURE OF AMATEUR STATUS AT ANY AGE
The following are examples of acts at any age which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of amateur status:
1. Professionalism.
a. Receiving payment or compensation for serving as a professional golfer or a teaching or playing assistant to a professional golfer.
b. Taking any action for the purpose of becoming a professional golfer.
Note: Inquiries as to the implications and prospects of becoming a professional do no constitute a breach of this Rule.
2. Playing for Prize Money.
Playing for prize money or its equivalent in a match, tournament or exhibition.
3. Instruction.
Receiving payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exception: Teachers of physical training or other subjects whose duties include instruction in games to pupils of a recognised educational establishment.
4. Prizes and Testimonials.
Acceptance of a prize or testimonial of the following character (this applies to total prizes received for any event or series of events in any one tournament or exhibition, including hole-in-one or other events in which golf skill is a factor):
(i)  In Great Britain and Ireland, of retail value exceeding 50, elsewhere, of retail value exceeding $200 U.S. or the equivalent, or such lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body of Golf in any country; or
(ii) Of a nature which is the equivalent of money or makes it readily convertible into money.
Exceptions:
1. Prizes of only symbolic value (such as metal trophies);
2. More than one testimonial award may be accepted from different donors even though their total retail value exceeds 50 or $200 U.S., provided they are not presented so as to evade such value limit for a single award. (Testimonial awards relate to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from tournament prizes).
5. Lending Name or Likeness.
Receiving or contracting to receive payment, compensation or personal benefit, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name or likeness to be used in any way for the advertisement or sale of anything, whether or not used in or appertaining to golf.
Note: An advertisement may contain a player's name or likeness when it is customary to the business of such a player and contains no reference to the game of golf.
6. Personal Appearance.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance, whether or not in connection with a golf competition or exhibition. (This includes appearances on radio and television broadcasts, testimonial dinners and the like.)
7. Writing.
Because of golf skill, receiving or contracting to receive payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for writing golf articles or books or for allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which he is not actually the author. (See Rule 1-3).
8. Sale of Golf Merchandise.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for selling or promoting the sale of golf merchandise, at either wholesale or retail. (The term "golf merchandise" does not include clothing or shoes).
9. Golf Equipment.
Accepting golf balls, clubs, golf merchandise, golf clothing or golf shoes from anyone dealing in such merchandise without payment of current market price.
10. Membership and Privileges.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting membership or privileges in a club or at a golf course without full payment for the class of membership or privileges involved unless such membership or privileges have been awarded as purely and deservedly honorary and in recognition of an outstanding performance or contribution to golf.
11. Expenses.
Accepting expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source other than the one on whom the player is normally or legally dependent to engage in:
a. A golf competition or exhibition.
b. A personal appearance as a golfer, including radio and television broadcasts, testimonial dinners and the like.
Exceptions:
A player may receive a reasonable amount of expenses as follows:
1. As a player in a golf competition or exhibition limited exclusively to players who have not reached their 18th birthday;
or
2. As a representative of his country, county, club or similar body, in team matches, or as a representative of his country taking part in a National Championship abroad immediately preceding or following directly upon an International team match, where such expenses are paid by the body he represents, or by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting.
Note 1: A player is not considered to be "normally or legally dependent" upon an employer, a partner or other vocational source, and acceptance of expenses therefrom is not permissible.
Note 2: Business Expenses. It is permissible to play in a golf competition while on a business trip with expenses paid provided that the golf part of the expenses is borne personally and is not charged to business. Further, the business involved must be actual and substantial, and not merely a subterfuge for legitimising expenses when the primary purpose is a golf competition.
Note 2: Private Transport. Acceptance of private transport furnished or arranged for by a tournament sponsor, directly or indirectly, as an inducement for a player to engage in a golf competition or exhibition shall be considered accepting expenses under Rule 1-11.
12. Scholarships.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or any other consideration as an inducement to be a student in an educational establishment.
13. Conduct Detrimental to Golf.
Any conduct, including activities in connection with golf gambling, which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the game.

RULE 2

PROCEDURE FOR ENFORCEMENT AND REINSTATEMENT

1. Decision on Violation.
Whenever information of a possible violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer by a player claiming to be an amateur shall come to the attention of the Executive Committee of the Governing Body, the Committee, after such investigation as it may deem desirable, shall decide whether a violation has occurred. Each case shall be considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final.

2. Enforcement.
Upon a decision that a player has violated the Definition of an Amateur Golfer, the Committee may declare the amateur status of the player forfeited or require the player to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his amateur status.
The Committee shall notify the player, if possible, and may notify any interested golf association of any action taken under this paragraph.

3. Reinstatement.
The Committee shall have sole power to reinstate a player to amateur status or to deny reinstatement.
Each application for reinstatement shall be decided on its merits.
In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:
a. Five Year limit.
A player shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement if he was in violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer for a calendar period of five years or more.
b. One Reinstatement
A player shall not be reinstated more than once.
c. Probation.
The professional holds an advantage over the amateur by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons violating the Rules of Amateur Status also obtain advantages not available to the amateur. They do not necessarily lose such advantage merely by deciding to cease violating the Rules.
Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur Status shall undergo probation as prescribed by the Committee.
Probation shall start from the date of the player's last violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer unless the Committee decides that it shall start from the date when the player's last violation became known to the Committee.
d. Probationary Period.
No applicant shall normally be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer for a probationary period of at least two consecutive years. The Committee, however, reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period.
e. Status during Probation.
During probation an applicant for reinstatement shall conform with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer.
He shall not be eligible to enter competitions as an amateur. He may, however, enter competitions solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club, but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.


Forms of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club
Each application for reinstatement in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales shall be submitted on the approved form to the County Union, District Association or Provincial Branch of the area where the Applicant wishes to play as an Amateur. The body concerned shall, after making all necessary enquiries, forward it through the National Union and the Professional Golfers' Association, with comments endorsed thereon, to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. Forms of application for reinstatement may be obtained from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club or from the National or County Unions. The Application shall include such information as the Royal and Ancient Golf Club may require from time to time and it shall be signed and certified by the Applicant.
Any application made elsewhere in countries, under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews which is doubtful or which is not covered by the above regulations may be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club through the Governing Body of Golf in that country.
The decision of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club on an application shall be final.





1976

Any person who considers that any action he is proposing to take might endanger his Amateur Status should submit particulars to the Committee for consideration.

DEFINITION OF AN AMATEUR GOLFER
An amateur golfer is one who plays the game solely as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport.

RULE 1

FORFEITURE OF AMATEUR STATUS AT ANY AGE
The following are examples of acts at any age which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of amateur status:
1. Professionalism.
a. Receiving payment or compensation for serving as a professional golfer or a teaching or playing assistant to a professional golfer.
b. Taking any action for the purpose of becoming a professional golfer.
2. Playing for Prize Money.
Playing for prize money or its equivalent in a match, tournament or exhibition.
3. Instruction.
Receiving payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exception: Teachers of physical training or other subjects whose duties include instruction in games to pupils of a recognised educational establishment.
4. Prizes and Testimonials.
Acceptance of a prize or testimonial of the following character (this applies to total prizes received for any event or series of events in any one tournament or exhibition, including hole-in-one or other events in which golf skill is a factor):
(i)  In Great Britain and Ireland, of retail value exceeding 100, elsewhere, of retail value exceeding $250 U.S. or the equivalent, or such lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body of Golf in any country; or
(ii) Of a nature which is the equivalent of money or makes it readily convertible into money.
Exceptions:
1. Prizes of only symbolic value (such as metal trophies);
2. More than one testimonial award may be accepted from different donors even though their total retail value exceeds 100 or $250 U.S., provided they are not presented so as to evade such value limit for a single award. (Testimonial awards relate to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from tournament prizes).
5. Lending Name or Likeness.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving or contracting to receive payment, compensation or personal benefit, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name or likeness to be used in any way for the advertisement or sale of anything, whether or not used in or appertaining to golf.
Note: An advertisement may contain a player's name or likeness when it is customary to the business of such a player and contains no reference to the game of golf.
6. Personal Appearance.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance.
Exception:
Actual expenses in connection with personal appearances may be paid or reimbursed provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.
7. Writing.
Because of golf skill, receiving or contracting to receive payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for writing golf articles or books or for allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which he is not actually the author. (See Rule 1-3).
8. Sale of Golf Merchandise.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for selling or promoting the sale of golf merchandise, at either wholesale or retail. (The term "golf merchandise" does not include clothing or shoes).
9. Golf Equipment.
Accepting golf balls, clubs, golf merchandise, golf clothing or golf shoes from anyone dealing in such merchandise without payment of current market price.
10. Membership and Privileges.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting membership or privileges in a club or at a golf course without full payment for the class of membership or privileges involved unless such membership or privileges have been awarded as purely and deservedly honorary and in recognition of an outstanding performance or contribution to golf.
11. Expenses.
Accepting expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to engage in a golf competition or exhibition.
Exceptions:
A player may receive a reasonable amount of expenses as follows:
1. From a member of the family or legal guardian;
or
2. As a player in a golf competition or exhibition limited exclusively to players who have not reached their 18th birthday;
or
3. As a representative of his country, county, club or similar body, in team matches, or as a representative of his country taking part in a National Championship abroad immediately preceding or following directly upon an international team match, where such expenses are paid by the body he represents, or by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting;
or
4. As an individual nominated by a National or County (or equivalent) Union to engage in a National or County event, at home or abroad, subject to the agreement of the National Union and the National Union of the Country staging the event, provided the individual has not reached the age of 22 (or such age, not exceeding 25, as may be determined by the Governing Body of Golf in the country concerned) and provided the expenses shall only be paid by the National or County (or equivalent) Union nominating the player.
5. As a player invited for reasons unrelated to golf skill, e.g. celebrities, business associates, etc., to take part in golfing events.
Note 1: Business Expenses. It is permissible to play in a golf competition while on a business trip with expenses paid provided that the golf part of the expenses is borne personally and is not charged to business. Further, the business involved must be actual and substantial, and not merely a subterfuge for legitimising expenses when the primary purpose is a golf competition.
Note 2: Private Transport. Acceptance of private transport furnished or arranged for by a tournament sponsor, directly or indirectly, as an inducement for a player to engage in a golf competition or exhibition shall be considered accepting expenses under Rule 1-11.
12. Scholarships.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or any other consideration as an inducement to be a student in an educational establishment.
13. Conduct Detrimental to Golf.
Any conduct, including activities in connection with golf gambling, which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the game.

RULE 2

PROCEDURE FOR ENFORCEMENT AND REINSTATEMENT

1. Decision on Violation.
Whenever information of a possible violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer by a player claiming to be an amateur shall come to the attention of the Executive Committee of the Governing Body, the Committee, after such investigation as it may deem desirable, shall decide whether a violation has occurred. Each case shall be considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final.

2. Enforcement.
Upon a decision that a player has violated the Definition of an Amateur Golfer, the Committee may declare the amateur status of the player forfeited or require the player to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his amateur status.
The Committee shall notify the player, if possible, and may notify any interested golf association of any action taken under this paragraph.

3. Reinstatement.
The Committee shall have sole power to reinstate a player to amateur status or to deny reinstatement.
Each application for reinstatement shall be decided on its merits.
In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:
a. Probation.
The professional holds an advantage over the amateur by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons violating the Rules of Amateur Status also obtain advantages not available to the amateur. They do not necessarily lose such advantage merely by deciding to cease violating the Rules.
Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur Status shall undergo probation as prescribed by the Committee.
Probation shall start from the date of the player's last violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer unless the Committee decides that it shall start from the date when the player's last violation became known to the Committee.
b. Probationary Period.
The period of probation shall normally be related to the period the player was in violation. However, no applicant shall normally be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer for a probationary period of at least two consecutive years. The Committee, however, reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period. A longer period will normally be required of applicants who have been in violation more than five years.
Players of national prominence who have been in violation for more than five years shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement.
c. One Reinstatement.
A player shall not normally be reinstated more than once.
d. Status during Probation.
During probation an applicant for reinstatement shall conform with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer.
He shall not be eligible to enter competitions as an amateur. He may, however, enter competitions solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club, but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.


Forms of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club
Each application for reinstatement in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales shall be submitted on the approved form to the County Union, District Association or Provincial Branch of the area where the Applicant wishes to play as an Amateur. The body concerned shall, after making all necessary enquiries, forward it through the National Union and the Professional Golfers' Association, with comments endorsed thereon, to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. Forms of application for reinstatement may be obtained from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club or from the National or County Unions. The Application shall include such information as the Royal and Ancient Golf Club may require from time to time and it shall be signed and certified by the Applicant.
Any application made elsewhere in countries, under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews which is doubtful or which is not covered by the above regulations may be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club through the Governing Body of Golf in that country.
The decision of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club on an application shall be final.





1980

Any person who considers that any action he is proposing to take might endanger his Amateur Status should submit particulars to the Committee for consideration.

DEFINITION OF AN AMATEUR GOLFER
An amateur golfer is one who plays the game solely as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport.

RULE 1

FORFEITURE OF AMATEUR STATUS AT ANY AGE
The following are examples of acts at any age which violate the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of amateur status:
1. Professionalism.
a. Receiving payment or compensation for serving as a professional golfer or a teaching or playing assistant to a professional golfer.
b. Taking any action for the purpose of becoming a professional golfer.
Note: Such actions include applying for a professional's position; filing application to a school or competition conducted to qualify persons to play as professionals in tournaments; entering into an agreement, written or oral with a sponsor or professional agent; agreement to accept payment or compensation for allowing one's name or likeness as a skilled golfer to be used for any commercial purpose; and holding or retaining membership in any organisation of professional golfers.
2. Playing for Prize Money.
Playing for prize money or its equivalent in a match, tournament or exhibition.
3. Instruction.
Receiving payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exception: Teachers of physical training or other subjects whose duties include instruction in games to pupils of a recognised educational establishment.
4. Prizes and Testimonials.
Acceptance of a prize or testimonial of the following character (this applies to total prizes received for any event or series of events in any one tournament or exhibition, including hole-in-one or other events in which golf skill is a factor):
(i)  In Great Britain and Ireland, of retail value exceeding 100, elsewhere, of retail value exceeding $250 U.S. or the equivalent, or such lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body of Golf in any country; or
(ii) Of a nature which is the equivalent of money or makes it readily convertible into money.
Exceptions:
1. Prizes of only symbolic value (such as metal trophies);
2. More than one testimonial award may be accepted from different donors even though their total retail value exceeds 100 or $250 U.S., provided they are not presented so as to evade such value limit for a single award. (Testimonial awards relate to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from tournament prizes).
Note: It is recommended that the total value of scratch prizes not exceed two times the value of the 1st prize in a 18-hole competition, three times the value of the 1st prize in a 36-hole competition and five times the value of the 1st prize in a 72-hole competition.
5. Lending Name or Likeness.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving or contracting to receive payment, compensation or personal benefit, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name or likeness to be used in any way for the advertisement or sale of anything, whether or not used in or appertaining to golf except as a golf author or broadcaster as permitted by Rule 1-7.
Note 1: An advertisement may contain a player's name or likeness when it is customary to the business of such a player and contains no reference to the game of golf.
Note 2: A player may accept golf balls, clubs, merchandise, clothing or shoes from anyone dealing in such merchandise provided no advertising is involved..
6. Personal Appearance.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance.
Exception:
Actual expenses in connection with personal appearances may be paid or reimbursed provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.
7. Broadcasting and Writing.
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for broadcasting concerning golf, a golf event or golf events, writing golf articles or books, or allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which he is not actually the author.
Exceptions:
1. Broadcasting or writing as part of one's primary occupation or career, provided instruction in playing golf is not included (Rule 1-3).
2. Part-time broadcasting or writing, provided (a) the player is actually the author of the commentary, articles or books, (b) instruction in playing golf is not included and (c) the payment or compensation does not have the purpose or effect, directly or indirectly, of financing participation in a golf competition or golf competitions.
8. Expenses.
Accepting expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to engage in a golf competition or exhibition.
Exceptions:
A player may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, as follows:

  1. From a member of the family or legal guardian; or

  2. As a player in a golf competition or exhibition limited exclusively to players who have not reached their 18th birthday prior to the year of the event; or

  3. As a representative of his Country, County, Club or similar body in team matches, or as a representative of his Country taking part in a National Championship abroad immediately preceding or following directly upon an international team match, where such expenses are paid by the body he represents, or by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting; or

  4. As an individual nominated by a National or County Union to engage in a National or County event at home or abroad provided that:
    (a) The player nominated has not reached the age of 22 or such age as may be determined by the Governing Body of Golf in the country from which the nomination is made.
    (b) The expenses shall be paid only by the National Union or County Union nominating the player.
    (c) In the case of a County event such event has been approved for this purpose by the County's National Union.
    (d) Where the event is to take place abroad, the approval of the Union staging the event and, if the nominating body is not the National Union of the country from which the nomination is made, the approval of the National Union shall first be obtained by the nominating body.
    (e) Where the event is to take place at home, and where the nomination is made by a County Union, the approval of the Union staging the event shall first be obtained.
    (Note: The term "County Union" covers any Province, State or equivalent Union or Association); or

  5. As a player invited for reasons unrelated to golf skill, e.g. celebrities, business associates, etc. to take part in golfing events; or

  6. As a player in an exhibition in aid of a recognised Charity provided the exhibition is not run in connection with another golfing event.
Note 1: Business Expenses. It is permissible to play in a golf competition while on a business trip with expenses paid provided that the golf part of the expenses is borne personally and is not charged to business. Further, the business involved must be actual and substantial, and not merely a subterfuge for legitimising expenses when the primary purpose is a golf competition.
Note 2: Private Transport. Acceptance of private transport furnished or arranged for by a tournament sponsor, directly or indirectly, as an inducement for a player to engage in a golf competition or exhibition shall be considered accepting expenses under Rule 1-11.
9. Scholarships
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or grant-in-aid other than one whose terms and conditions have been approved by the Amateur Status Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.
10. Conduct Detrimental to Golf
Any conduct, including activities in connection with golf gambling, which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the game.

RULE 2

PROCEDURE FOR ENFORCEMENT AND REINSTATEMENT

1. Decision on Violation.
Whenever information of a possible violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer by a player claiming to be an amateur shall come to the attention of the Executive Committee of the Governing Body, the Committee, after such investigation as it may deem desirable, shall decide whether a violation has occurred. Each case shall be considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final.

2. Enforcement.
Upon a decision that a player has violated the Definition of an Amateur Golfer, the Committee may declare the amateur status of the player forfeited or require the player to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his amateur status.
The Committee shall notify the player, if possible, and may notify any interested golf association of any action taken under this paragraph.

3. Reinstatement.
The Committee shall have sole power to reinstate a player to amateur status or to deny reinstatement.
Each application for reinstatement shall be decided on its merits.
In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:
a. Probation.
The professional holds an advantage over the amateur by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons violating the Rules of Amateur Status also obtain advantages not available to the amateur. They do not necessarily lose such advantage merely by deciding to cease violating the Rules.
Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur Status shall undergo probation as prescribed by the Committee.
Probation shall start from the date of the player's last violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer unless the Committee decides that it shall start from the date when the player's last violation became known to the Committee.
b. Probationary Period.
The period of probation shall normally be related to the period the player was in violation. However, no applicant shall normally be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer for a probationary period of at least two consecutive years. The Committee, however, reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period. A longer period will normally be required of applicants who have been in violation more than five years.
Players of national prominence who have been in violation for more than five years shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement.
c. One Reinstatement.
A player shall not normally be reinstated more than once.
d. Status during Probation.
During probation an applicant for reinstatement shall conform with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer.
He shall not be eligible to enter competitions as an amateur. He may, however, enter competitions solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club; but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.


Forms of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club
Each application for reinstatement in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales shall be submitted on the approved form to the County Union, District Association or Provincial Branch of the area where the Applicant wishes to play as an Amateur. The body concerned shall, after making all necessary enquiries, forward it through the National Union and the Professional Golfers' Association, with comments endorsed thereon, to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. Forms of application for reinstatement may be obtained from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club or from the National or County Unions. The Application shall include such information as the Royal and Ancient Golf Club may require from time to time and it shall be signed and certified by the Applicant.
Any application made elsewhere in countries, under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews which is doubtful or which is not covered by the above regulations may be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club through the Governing Body of Golf in that country.
The decision of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club on an application shall be final.





1984

Any person who considers that any action he is proposing to take might endanger his Amateur Status should submit particulars to the Committee for consideration.

Definition of an Amateur Golfer
An Amateur Golfer is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport.

RULE 1: FORFEITURE OF AMATEUR STATUS AT ANY AGE

The following are examples of acts at any age which are contrary to the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of Amateur Status:

1-1 Professionalism
a. Receiving payment or compensation for serving as a Professional golfer or a teaching or playing assistant to a Professional golfer.
b. Taking any action for the purpose of becoming a Professional golfer.
Note: Such actions include applying for a professional's position; filing application to a school or competition conducted to qualify persons to play as professionals in tournaments; receiving services from or entering into an agreement, written or oral, with a sponsor or professional agent; agreement to accept payment or compensation for allowing one's name or likeness as a skilled golfer to be used for any commercial purpose; and holding or retaining membership in any organisation of professional golfers.

1-2 Playing for Prize Money
Playing for prize money or its equivalent in a match, tournament or exhibition.

1-3 Instruction
Receiving payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exception:
Teachers of physical training or other subjects whose duties include instruction in games to students of schools or Universities. Instruction in Adult Educational Establishments is not covered by the exception.

1-4 Prizes and Testimonials
(a) Acceptance of a prize, prize voucher or testimonial in Great Britain and Ireland of retail value exceeding 150; elsewhere of retail value exceeding $350 US or the equivalent, or such lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body of golf in any country, or
(b) Conversion of a prize or prize voucher into money.
(c) Accepting a gratuity in connection with a golfing event.
Exceptions:
1. Prizes of only symbolic value, provided that their symbolic nature is distinguished by distinctive permanent marking; for example, trophies, plates or cups of metal (other than precious metal) and distinctively marked, or ashtrays, cigarette boxes or tankards made of silver (or silver plate) or other precious metal and engraved, or engraved glass-wear.
2. More than one testimonial award may be accepted from different donors even though their total retail value exceeds 150 or $350 US, provided they are not presented so as to evade such value limit for a single award. Note 1. Events covered. The limits referred to in Clause (a) above apply to total prize or prize vouchers received by any one person for any event or series of events in any one tournament or exhibition, including hole-in-one or other events in which golf skill is a factor.
Note 2. Purpose of Prize Vouchers. A voucher may be issued by the Committee in charge of a competition for any retail purpose provided the purpose for which it may be used is accurately defined and provided payment against it is only made by the Committee.
Note 3. Maximum Value of Prizes in any event. It is recommended that the total value of scratch prizes should not exceed twice the maximum retail value of prize permitted in Rule 1-4(a) and (c) in an 18-hole competition, three times in a 36-hole competition, and five times in a 72-hole competition.
Note 4. Testimonial Awards. Such awards relate to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from tournament prizes.

1-5 Lending Name or Likeness
Because of golf skill or golf reputation receiving or contracting to receive payment, compensation or personal benefit, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name or likeness to be used in any way for the advertisement or sale of anything, whether or not used in or appertaining to golf except as a golf author or broadcaster as permitted by Rule 1-7.
Note: A player may accept equipment from anyone dealing in such equipment provided no advertising is involved.

1-6 Personal Appearance
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance.
Exception:
Actual expenses in connection with personal appearances may be paid or reimbursed provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.

1-7 Broadcasting and Writing
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for broadcasting concerning golf, a golf event or golf events, writing golf articles or books, or allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which one is not actually the author.
Exceptions:
1. Broadcasting or writing as part of one's primary occupation or career, provided instruction in playing golf is not included (Rule 1-3).
2. Part-time broadcasting or writing, provided (a) the player is actually the author of the commentary, articles or books, (b) instruction in playing golf is not included and (c) the payment or compensation does not have the purpose or effect, directly or indirectly, of financing participation in a golf competition or golf competitions.

1-8 Expenses
Accepting expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to engage in a golf competition or exhibition.
Exceptions:
A player may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, as follows:

  1. From a member of the family or legal guardian; or

  2. As a player in a golf competition or exhibition limited exclusively to players who have not reached their 18th birthday prior to the year of the event; or

  3. As a representative of his Country, County, Club or similar body in team matches, or as a representative of his Country taking part in a National Championship abroad immediately preceding or following directly upon an international team match, where such expenses are paid by the body he represents, or by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting; or

  4. As an individual nominated by a National or County Union to engage in a National or County event at home or abroad provided that:
    (a) The player nominated has not reached such age as may be determined by the Governing Body of Golf in the country from which the nomination is made.
    (b) The expenses shall be paid only by the National Union or County Union nominating the player.
    (c) In the case of a County event such event has been approved for this purpose by the County's National Union.
    (d) Where the event is to take place abroad, the approval of the Union staging the event and, if the nominating body is not the National Union of the country from which the nomination is made, the approval of the National Union shall first be obtained by the nominating body.
    (e) Where the event is to take place at home, and where the nomination is made by a County Union, the approval of the Union staging the event shall first be obtained.
    (Note: The term "County Union" covers any Province, State or equivalent Union or Association); or

  5. As a player invited for reasons unrelated to golf skill, e.g. celebrities, business associates, etc. to take part in golfing events; or

  6. As a player in an exhibition in aid of a recognised Charity provided the exhibition is not run in connection with another golfing event.
(Note 1: Business Expenses. It is permissible to play in a golf competition while on a business trip with expenses paid provided that the golf part of the expenses is borne personally and is not charged to business. Further, the business involved must be actual and substantial, and not merely a subterfuge for legitimising expenses when the primary purpose is a golf competition).
(Note 2: Private Transport. Acceptance of private transport furnished or arranged for by a tournament sponsor, directly or indirectly, as an inducement for a player to engage in a golf competition or exhibition shall be considered accepting expenses under Rule 1-8).

1-9 Scholarships
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or grant-in-aid other than one whose terms and conditions have been approved by the Amateur Status Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

1-10 Membership and Privileges
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting membership or privileges in a Club or at a golf course without full payment for the class of membership or privileges involved unless such membership or privileges have been awarded (i) as purely and deservedly honorary, (ii) in recognition of an outstanding performance or contribution to golf and (iii) without a time limit.

1-11 Conduct Detrimental to Golf
Any conduct, including activities in connection with golf gambling, which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the game.

RULE 2: PROCEDURE FOR ENFORCEMENT AND REINSTATEMENT

2-1. Decision on Violation
Whenever information of a possible violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer by a player claiming to be an Amateur shall come to the attention of the appropriate Committee of the Governing Body, the Committee, after such investigation as it may deem desirable, shall decide whether a violation has occurred. Each case shall be considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final.

2-2. Enforcement
Upon a decision that a player has violated the Definition of an Amateur Golfer, the Committee may declare the Amateur Status of the player forfeited or require the player to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his Amateur Status.
The Committee shall notify the player, if possible, and may notify any interested Golf Association of any action taken under this paragraph.

2-3. Reinstatement
The Committee shall have sole power to reinstate a player to Amateur Status or to deny reinstatement. Each application for reinstatement shall be decided on its merits. In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:

a. Probation
The Professional holds an advantage over the amateur by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons violating the Rules of Amateur Status also obtain advantages not available to the amateur. They do not necessarily lose such advantage merely by deciding to cease violating the Rules. Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur Status shall undergo probation as prescribed by the Committee.
Probation shall start from the date of the player's last violation of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer unless the Committee decides that it shall start from the date when the player's last violation became known to the Committee.

b. Probationary Period
The period of probation shall normally be related to the period the player was in violation. However, no applicant shall normally be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer for a probationary period of at least two consecutive years. The Committee, however, reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period. A longer period will normally be required of applicants who have been in violation for more than five years. Players of national prominence who have been in violation for more than five years shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement.

c. One Reinstatement
A player shall not normally be reinstated more than once.

d. Status during Probation
During probation an applicant for reinstatement shall conform with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer.
He shall not be eligible to enter competitions as an Amateur. He may, however, enter competitions solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club; but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.


Forms of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club

Each application for reinstatement in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales shall be submitted on the approved form to the County Union, District Association or Provincial Branch of the area where the applicant wishes to play as an Amateur. The body concerned shall, after making all necessary enquiries, forward it through the National Union (and in the case of lady applicants, the Ladies Golf Union) and the Professional Golfers Association, with comments endorsed thereon, to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews. Forms of application for reinstatement may be obtained from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club or from the National or County Unions. The application shall include such information as the Royal and Ancient Golf Club may require from time to time and it shall be signed and certified by the applicant.

Amateur Status
Any application made elsewhere in countries under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews which is doubtful or which is not covered by the above regulations may be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews through the Governing Body of Golf in that country.
The decision of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club on an application shall be final.





1988

Any person who considers that any action he is proposing to take might endanger his Amateur Status should submit particulars to the Committee for consideration.

Definition of an Amateur Golfer
An Amateur Golfer is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport.

The Governing Body
The Governing Body of golf for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the National Union of the country concerned except in Great Britain and Ireland where the Governing Body is the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews.
Any person who considers that any action he is proposing to take might endanger his Amateur Status should submit particulars to the appropriate Committee of the Governing Body for consideration.

RULE 1: FORFEITURE OF AMATEUR STATUS AT ANY AGE

The following are examples of acts at any age which are contrary to the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of Amateur Status:

1-1 Professionalism
a. Receiving payment or compensation for serving as a Professional golfer or a teaching or playing assistant to a Professional golfer.
b. Taking any action for the purpose of becoming a Professional golfer, except applying unsuccessfully for the position of a teaching or playing assistant to a Professional golfer.
Note 1: Such actions include filing application to a school or competition conducted to qualify persons to play as Professionals in tournaments; receiving services from or entering into an agreement, written or oral, with a sponsor or professional agent; agreement to accept payment or compensation for allowing one's name or likeness as a skilled golfer to be used for any commercial purpose; and holding or retaining membership in any organisation of Professional golfers.
Note 2: Receiving payment or compensation as a shop assistant is not in itself a breach of the Rules, provided duties do not include playing or giving instruction.

1-2 Playing for Prize Money
Playing for prize money or its equivalent in a match, tournament or exhibition.

1-3 Instruction
Receiving payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exceptions:
1. Golf instruction may be given by an employee of an educational institution or system to students of the institution or system and by camp counsellors to those in their charge, provided that the total time devoted to golf instruction during the year comprises less than 50 percent of the time spent during the year in the performance of all duties as such employer or counsellor.
2. Payment or compensation may be accepted for instruction in writing, provided one's ability or reputation as a golfer was not a major factor in his employment or in the commission or sale of his work.

1-4 Prizes and Testimonials
(a) Acceptance of a prize or prize voucher of retail value exceeding as follows:
In Europe Elsewhere
For an event of more than 2 rounds
170
or the
equivalent
$400 US
For an event of 2 rounds or less
110
$260 US
or such lesser figure, if any, as may be decided by the Governing Body of golf in any country, or
(b) Acceptance of a testimonial in Europe of retail value exceeding 170 or the equivalent, elsewhere of retail value exceeding $400 US or the equivalent, or such lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body of golf in any country, or
(c) For a junior golfer, of such age as may be determined by the Governing Body of golf in any country, taking part in an event limited exclusively to juniors, acceptance of a prize or prize voucher in Europe of retail value exceeding 50 or the equivalent; elsewhere of retail value exceeding $120 US or the equivalent, or such lesser figure, if any, as may be decided by the Governing Body of golf in any country, or
(d) Conversion of a prize or prize voucher into money, or
(e) Accepting a gratuity in connection with a golfing event.

Exceptions:
1. Prizes of only symbolic value, provided that their symbolic nature is distinguished by distinctive permanent marking.
2. More than one testimonial award may be accepted from different donors even though their total retail value exceeds 170 or $400 US, provided they are not presented so as to evade such value limit for a single award.
Note 1. Events covered. The limits referred to in Clauses (a) or (c) above apply to total prize vouchers received by any one person for any event or series of events in any one tournament or exhibition, including hole-in-one or other events in which golf skill is a factor.
Note 2. "Retail Value" is the price at which merchandise is available to anyone at a retail source, and the onus of proving the value of a particular prize rests with the donor.
Note 3. Purpose of Prize Vouchers. A prize voucher may be issued and redeemed only by the Committee in charge of a competition for the purchase of goods from a Professional's shop or other retail source, which may be specified by the Committee. It may not be used for such items as travel or hotel expenses, a bar bill, or a Club subscription.
Note 4. Maximum Value of Prizes in any event for individuals. It is recommended that the total value of scratch or each division of handicap prizes should not exceed twice the maximum retail value of prize permitted in Rule 1-4(a) and (c) in an 18-hole competition, three times in a 36-hole competition, four times in a 54-hole competition and five times in a 72-hole competition.
Note 5. Testimonial Awards. Such awards relate to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from tournament prizes.

1-5 Lending Name or Likeness
Because of golf skill or golf reputation receiving or contracting to receive payment, compensation or personal benefit, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name or likeness to be used in any way for the advertisement or sale of anything, whether or not used in or appertaining to golf except as a golf author or broadcaster as permitted by Rule 1-7.
Note: A player may accept equipment from anyone dealing in such equipment provided no advertising is involved.

1-6 Personal Appearance
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance.
Exception:
Actual expenses in connection with personal appearances may be paid or reimbursed provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.

1-7 Broadcasting and Writing
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for broadcasting concerning golf, a golf event or golf events, writing golf articles or books, or allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which one is not actually the author.
Exceptions:
1. Broadcasting or writing as part of one's primary occupation or career, provided instruction in playing golf is not included (Rule 1-3).
2. Part-time broadcasting or writing, provided (a) the player is actually the author of the commentary, articles or books, (b) instruction in playing golf is not included and (c) the payment or compensation does not have the purpose or effect, directly or indirectly, of financing participation in a golf competition or golf competitions.

1-8 Expenses
Accepting expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to engage in a golf competition or exhibition.
Exceptions:
A player may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, as follows:

  1. From a member of the family or legal guardian; or

  2. As a player in a golf competition or exhibition limited exclusively to players who have not reached their 18th birthday; or

  3. As a representative of his Country, County, Club or similar body in team competitions or team training camps at home or abroad, or as a representative of his Country taking part in a National Championship abroad immediately preceding or following directly upon an international team competition, where such expenses are paid by the body he represents, or by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting; or

  4. As an individual nominated by a National or County Union or a Club to engage in an event at home or abroad provided that:
    (a) The player nominated has not reached such age as may be determined by the Governing Body of Golf in the country from which the nomination is made.
    (b) The expenses shall be paid only by the National Union or County Union responsible in the area from which the nomination is made and shall be limited to twenty competitive days in any one calendar year. The expenses are deemed to include reasonable travelling time and practice days in connection with the twenty competitive days.
    (c) Where the event is to take place abroad, the approval of the National Union of the country in which the event is to be staged and, if the nominating body is not the national union of the country from which the nomination is made, the approval of the national union shall first be obtained by the nominating body.
    (d) Where the event is to take place at home, and where the nomination is made by a County Union or Club, the approval of the National Union or County Union in the area in which the event is to be shall first be obtained.
    (Note: The term "County Union" covers any Province, State or equivalent Union or Association); or

  5. As a player invited for reasons unrelated to golf skill, e.g. celebrities, business associates, etc. to take part in golfing events; or

  6. As a player in an exhibition in aid of a recognised Charity provided the exhibition is not run in connection with another golfing event; or

  7. As a player in a handicap individual or handicap team sponsored golfing event where expenses are paid by the sponsor on behalf of the player to take part in the event provided the event has been approved as follows:
    (a) Where the event is to take place at home the approval of the Governing Body (see Definition) shall first be obtained in advance by the sponsor, and
    (b) Where the event is to take place both at home and abroad the approval of the two or more Governing Bodies shall first be obtained in advance by the sponsor. The application for this approval should be sent to the Governing Body of golf in the country where the competition commences.
    (c) Where the event is to take place abroad the approval of two or more Governing Bodies shall first be obtained by the sponsor. The application for this approval should be sent to the Governing Body of golf in the country whose players shall be taking part in the event abroad.
Note 1: Business Expenses. It is permissible to play in a golf competition while on a business trip with expenses paid provided that the golf part of the expenses is borne personally and is not charged to business. Further, the business involved must be actual and substantial, and not merely a subterfuge for legitimising expenses when the primary purpose is a golf competition).
(Note 2: Private Transport. Acceptance of private transport furnished or arranged for by a tournament sponsor, directly or indirectly, as an inducement for a player to engage in a golf competition or exhibition shall be considered accepting expenses under Rule 1-8).

1-9 Scholarships
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or grant-in-aid other than one whose terms and conditions have been approved by the Amateur Status Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

1-10 Membership
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting membership in a Golf Club without full payment for the class of membership for the purpose of playing for that Club.

1-11 Conduct Detrimental to Golf
Any conduct, including activities in connection with golf gambling, which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the game.

RULE 2: PROCEDURE FOR ENFORCEMENT AND REINSTATEMENT

2-1. Decision on a Breach
Whenever information of a possible act contrary to the Definition of an Amateur Golfer by a player claiming to be an Amateur shall come to the attention of the appropriate Committee of the Governing Body, the Committee, after such investigation as it may deem desirable, shall decide whether a breach has occurred. Each case shall be considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final.

2-2. Enforcement
Upon a decision that a player has acted contrary to the Definition of an Amateur Golfer, the Committee may declare the Amateur Status of the player forfeited or require the player to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his Amateur Status.
The Committee shall use its best endeavour to ensure that the player is notified and may notify any interested Golf Association of any action taken under this paragraph.

2-3. Reinstatement
The Committee shall have sole power to reinstate a player to Amateur Status or to deny reinstatement. Each application for reinstatement shall be decided on its merits. In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:

a. Awaiting reinstatement
The Professional holds an advantage over the amateur by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons infringing the Rules of Amateur Status also obtain advantages not available to the amateur. They do not necessarily lose such advantage merely by deciding to cease infringing the Rules. Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur Status shall undergo probation as prescribed by the Committee.
The period awaiting reinstatement shall start from the date of the player's last breach of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer unless the Committee decides that it shall start from the date when the player's last breach became known to the Committee.

b. Period Awaiting Reinstatement
The period awaiting reinstatement shall normally be related to the period the player was in breach. However, no applicant shall normally be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer for a period of at least two consecutive years. The Committee, however, reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period. A longer period will normally be required of applicants who have been in breach for more than five years. Players of national prominence who have been in breach for more than five years shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement.

c. One Reinstatement
A player shall not normally be reinstated more than once.

d. Status While Awaiting Reinstatement
During the period awaiting reinstatement an applicant for reinstatement shall conform with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer.
He shall not be eligible to enter competitions as an Amateur. He may, however, enter competitions, and win a prize, solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club; but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.


Forms of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club

(a) Each application for reinstatement in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales shall be submitted on the approved form to the County Union where the applicant wishes to play as an Amateur. Such union shall, after making all necessary enquiries, forward it through the National Union (and in the case of lady applicants, the Ladies' Golf Union) and the appropriate Professional Golfers' Association, with comments endorsed thereon, to the Governing Body of golf in that country. Forms of application for reinstatement may be obtained from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club or from the National or County Unions. The application shall include such information as the Royal and Ancient Golf Club may require from time to time and it shall be signed and certified by the applicant.
(b) Any application made in countries under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews which the Governing Body of golf in that country considers to be doubtful or not to be covered by the above regulations may be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews whose decision shall be final.





1992-6

DEFINITIONS

Definition of an Amateur Golfer
An Amateur Golfer is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative or non-profit-making sport.

The Governing Body
The Governing Body of golf for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the National Union of the country concerned except in Great Britain and Ireland where the Governing Body is the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

Any person who considers that any action he is proposing to take might endanger his Amateur Status should submit particulars to the appropriate Committee of the Governing Body for consideration.

RULE 1: FORFEITURE OF AMATEUR STATUS AT ANY AGE

The following are examples of acts which are contrary to the Definition of an Amateur Golfer and cause forfeiture of Amateur Status:

1-1 Professionalism
a. Receiving payment or compensation for serving as a Professional golfer or a teaching or playing assistant to a Professional golfer.
b. Taking any action for the purpose of becoming a Professional golfer except applying unsuccessfully for the position of a teaching or playing assistant to a Professional golfer.

Note 1. Such actions include filing application to a final or sole qualifying school or competition conducted to qualify persons to play as Professionals in tournaments; receiving services from or entering into an agreement, written or oral, with a sponsor or Professional agent; agreement to accept payment or compensation for allowing one's name or likeness as a skilled golfer to be used for any commercial purpose; and holding or retaining membership in any organisation of Professional golfers.
Note 2. Receiving payment or compensation as a shop assistant is not itself a breach of the Rules, provided duties do not include playing or giving instruction.

1-2 Playing for Prize Money
Playing for prize money or its equivalent in a match, tournament or exhibition.

1-3 Instruction
Receiving payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf, either orally, in writing, by pictures or by other demonstrations, to either individuals or groups.
Exceptions:
1. Golf instruction may be given by an employee of an educational institution or system to students of the institution or system and by camp counsellors to those in their charge, provided that the total time devoted to golf instruction during a year comprises less than 50 percent of the time spent during the year in the performance of all duties as such employee or counsellor.
2. Payment or compensation may be accepted for instruction in writing, provided one's ability or reputation as a golfer was not a major factor in one's employment or in the commission or sale of one's work.

1-4 Prizes and Testimonials
(a) Acceptance of a prize or prize voucher of retail value exceeding as follows:
In Europe Elsewhere
For an event of more than 2 rounds
300
or the
equivalent
$500 US
For an event of 2 rounds or less
200
$350 US
or such lesser figure, if any, as may be decided by the Governing Body of golf in any country, or
(b) Acceptance of a testimonial in Europe of retail value exceeding 300 or the equivalent, elsewhere of retail value exceeding $500 US or the equivalent, or such lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body of golf in any country, or
(c) For a junior golfer, of such age as may be determined by the Governing Body of golf in any country, taking part in an event limited exclusively to juniors, acceptance of a prize or prize voucher in Europe of retail value exceeding 100 or the equivalent; elsewhere of retail value exceeding $200 US or the equivalent, or such lesser figure, if any, as may be decided by the Governing Body of golf in any country, or
(d) Conversion of a prize or prize voucher into money, or
(e) Accepting a gratuity in connection with a golfing event.

Exceptions:
1. Prizes of only symbolic value, provided that their symbolic nature is distinguished by distinctive permanent marking.
2. More than one testimonial award may be accepted from different donors even though their total retail value exceeds 300 or $500 US, provided they are not presented so as to evade such value limit for a single award.
Note 1. Events covered. The limits referred to in Clauses (a) or (c) above apply to total prize vouchers received by any one person for any event or series of events in any one tournament or exhibition, including hole-in-one or other events in which golf skill is a factor.
Note 2. "Retail Value" is the price at which merchandise is available to anyone at a retail source, and the onus of proving the value of a particular prize rests with the donor.
Note 3. Purpose of Prize Vouchers. A prize voucher may be issued and redeemed only by the Committee in charge of a competition for the purchase of goods from a Professional's shop or other retail source, which may be specified by the Committee. It may not be used for such items as travel or hotel expenses, a bar bill, or a Club subscription.
Note 4. Maximum Value of Prizes in any event for individuals. It is recommended that the total value of scratch or each division of handicap prizes should not exceed twice the maximum retail value of prize permitted in Rule 1-4(a) and (c) in an 18-hole competition, three times in a 36-hole competition, four times in a 54-hole competition and five times in a 72-hole competition.
Note 5. Testimonial Awards. Such awards relate to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from tournament prizes.

1-5 Lending Name or Likeness
Because of golf skill or golf reputation receiving or contracting to receive payment, compensation or personal benefit, directly or indirectly, for allowing one's name or likeness to be used in any way for the advertisement or sale of anything, whether or not used in or appertaining to golf except as a golf author or broadcaster as permitted by Rule 1-7.
Note: A player may accept equipment from anyone dealing in such equipment provided no advertising is involved.

1-6 Personal Appearance
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance.
Exception:
Actual expenses in connection with personal appearances may be paid or reimbursed provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.

1-7 Broadcasting and Writing
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, receiving payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for broadcasting concerning golf, a golf event or golf events, writing golf articles or books, or allowing one's name to be advertised or published as the author of golf articles or books of which one is not actually the author.
Exceptions:
1. Broadcasting or writing as part of one's primary occupation or career, provided instruction in playing golf is not included (Rule 1-3).
2. Part-time broadcasting or writing, provided (a) the player is actually the author of the commentary, articles or books, (b) instruction in playing golf is not included and (c) the payment or compensation does not have the purpose or effect, directly or indirectly, of financing participation in a golf competition or golf competitions.

1-8 Expenses
Accepting expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to engage in a golf competition or exhibition.
Exceptions:
A player may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, as follows:

  1. From a member of the family or legal guardian; or

  2. As a player in a golf competition or exhibition limited exclusively to players who have not reached their 18th birthday prior to the year of the event; or

  3. As a representative of his Country, County, Club or similar body in team competition or team training camps at home or abroad, or as a representative of his Country taking part in a National Championship abroad immediately preceding or following directly upon an international team competition, where such expenses are paid by the body he represents, or by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting; or

  4. As an individual nominated by a National or County Union or a Club to engage in an event at home or abroad provided that:
    (a) The player nominated has not reached such age as may be determined by the Governing Body of golf in the country from which the nomination is made.
    (b) The expenses shall be paid only by the National Union or County Union responsible in the area from which the nomination is made or, subject to the approval of the nominating body, by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting. The expenses shall be limited to a specified number of competitive days in any one calendar year as may be determined by the Governing Body of Golf in the country from which the nomination is made. The expenses are deemed to include reasonable travelling time and practice days in connection with the competitive days.
    1992: (b) The expenses shall be paid only by the National Union or County Union responsible in the area from which the nomination is made and shall be limited to twenty competitive days in any one calendar year. The expenses are deemed to include reasonable travelling time and practice days in connection with the twenty competitive days.
    1996: (b) The expenses shall be paid only by the National Union or County Union responsible in the area from which the nomination is made or, subject to the approval of the nominating body, by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting. The expenses shall be limited to a specified number of competitive days in any one calendar year as may be determined by the Governing Body of Golf in the country from which the nomination is made. The expenses are deemed to include reasonable travelling time and practice days in connection with the competitive days.
    (c) Where the event is to take place abroad, the approval of the National Union of the country in which the event is to be staged and, if the nominating body is not the National Union of the country from which the nomination is made, the approval of the National Union shall first be obtained by the nominating body.
    (d) Where the event is to take place at home, and where the nomination is made by a County Union or Club, the approval of the National Union or the County Union in the area in which the event is to be staged shall first be obtained.
    (Note: The term "County Union" covers any Province, State or equivalent Union or Association); or

  5. As a player invited for reasons unrelated to golf skill, e.g. celebrities, business associates, etc. to take part in golfing events; or

  6. As a player in an exhibition in aid of a recognised Charity provided the exhibition is not run in connection with another golfing event; or

  7. As a player in a handicap individual or handicap team sponsored golfing event where expenses are paid by the sponsor on behalf of the player to take part in the event provided the event has been approved as follows:
    (a) Where the event is to take place at home the approval of the Governing Body (see Definition) shall first be obtained in advance by the sponsor, and
    (b) Where the event is to take place both at home and abroad the approval of the two or more Governing Bodies shall first be obtained in advance by the sponsor. The application for this approval should be sent to the Governing Body of golf in the country where the competition commences.
    (c) Where the event is to take place abroad the approval of two or more Governing Bodies shall first be obtained by the sponsor. The application for this approval should be sent to the Governing Body of golf in the country whose players shall be taking part in the event abroad.

(Note 1: Business Expenses. It is permissible to play in a golf competition while on a business trip with expenses paid provided that the golf part of the expenses is borne personally and is not charged to business. Further, the business involved must be actual and substantial, and not merely a subterfuge for legitimising expenses when the primary purpose is a golf competition).
(Note 2: Private Transport. Acceptance of private transport furnished or arranged for by a tournament sponsor, directly or indirectly, as an inducement for a player to engage in a golf competition or exhibition shall be considered accepting expenses under Rule 1-8).

1-9 Scholarships
Because of golf skill or golf reputation, accepting the benefits of a scholarship or grant-in-aid other than one whose terms and conditions have been approved by the Amateur Status Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

1-10 Membership
Because of golf skill accepting membership in a Golf Club without full payment for the class of membership for the purpose of playing for that Club.

1-11 Conduct Detrimental to Golf
Any conduct, including activities in connection with golf gambling, which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the game.

RULE 2: PROCEDURE FOR ENFORCEMENT AND REINSTATEMENT

2-1. Decision on a Breach
Whenever information of a possible breach of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer by a player claiming to be an Amateur shall come to the attention of the appropriate Committee of the Governing Body, the Committee, after such investigation as it may deem desirable, shall decide whether a breach has occurred. Each case shall be considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final.

2-2. Enforcement
Upon a decision that a player has acted contrary to the Definition of an Amateur Golfer, the Committee may declare the Amateur Status of the player forfeited or require the player to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his Amateur Status.
The Committee shall use its best endeavours to ensure that the player is notified and may notify any interested Golf Association of any action taken under this paragraph.

2-3. Reinstatement
The Committee shall have sole power to reinstate a player to Amateur Status or to deny reinstatement. Each application for reinstatement shall be decided on its merits. In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:

a. Awaiting Reinstatement
The Professional holds an advantage over the Amateur by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons infringing the Rules of Amateur Status also obtain advantages not available to the Amateur. They do not necessarily lose such advantage merely by deciding to cease infringing the Rules. Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur Status shall undergo a period awaiting reinstatement as prescribed by the Committee.
The period awaiting reinstatement shall start from the date of the player's last breach of the Definition of an Amateur Golfer unless the Committee decides that it shall start from the date when the player's last breach became known to the Committee.

b. Period Awaiting Reinstatement
The period awaiting reinstatement shall normally be related to the period the player was in breach. However, no applicant shall normally be eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer for a period of at least two consecutive years. The Committee, however, reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period. A longer period will normally be required of applicants who have been in breach for more than five years. Players of national prominence who have been in breach for more than five years shall not normally be eligible for reinstatement.

c. One Reinstatement
A player shall not normally be reinstated more than once.

d. Status While Awaiting Reinstatement
During the period awaiting reinstatement an applicant for reinstatement shall conform with the Definition of an Amateur Golfer.
He shall not be eligible to enter competitions as an Amateur. He may, however, enter competitions, and win a prize, solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club; but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.

Forms of Application for Countries under the Jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club

(a) Each application for reinstatement shall be submitted on the approved form to the County Union where the applicant wishes to play as an Amateur. Such Union shall, after making all necessary enquiries, forward it through the National Union (and in the case of lady applicants, the Ladies Golf Union) and the appropriate Professional Golfers' Association, with comments endorsed thereon, to the Governing Body of golf in that country. Forms of application for reinstatement may be obtained from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club or from the National or County Unions. The application shall include such information as the Royal and Ancient Golf Club may require from time to time and it shall be signed and certified by the applicant.
(b) Any application made in countries under the jurisdiction of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews which the Governing Body of golf in that country considers to be doubtful or not to be covered by the above regulations may be submitted to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews whose decision shall be final.






2000

Preamble
The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews reserves the right to change the Rules and to make and change the interpretations relating to Amateur Status at any time.

DEFINITIONS

The Definitions are placed in alphabetical order, and some are also repeated at the beginning of their relevant Rule. In the Rules themselves, defined terms are italicised.

Amateur Golfer
An "amateur golfer" is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative and non-profit-making sport and who does not receive remuneration for teaching golf or for other activities because of golf skill or reputation, except as provided in the Rules.

Committee
The "Committee" is the appropriate Committee of the Governing body.

Golf Skill or Reputation
Generally, an Amateur golfer is only considered to have golf skill if he has gained representative honours at county or national level. Golf reputation can only be gained through golf skill and does not include prominence for service to the game of golf as an administrator. It is a matter for a governing body to decide whether a particular amateur golfer has "golf skill or reputation".

Governing Body
The "Governing Body" for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union of that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews is the Governing Body.

Instruction
"Instruction" covers the physical aspects of playing golf, i.e. the actual mechanics of swinging a golf club and hitting a golf ball.

Junior Golfer
A "junior golfer" is an Amateur golfer who has not yet reached his 18th birthday in the year prior to the event, unless a different age is decided by the Governing Body.

Prize Voucher
A "prize voucher" is a voucher issued by the Committee in charge of a competition for the purchase of goods from a Professional's shop or other retail source.

Retail Value
The "retail value" of a prize is the normal recommended selling price at which merchandise is available to anyone at a retail source.

Rule or Rules
The term "Rule" or "Rules" refers to the Rules of Amateur Status as determined by the Governing Body.

Symbolic Prize
A "symbolic prize" is a trophy made of gold, silver, ceramic, glass or the like which is permanently and distinctively engraved.

Testimonial Award
A "testimonial award" relates to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from competition prizes. A testimonial award may not be a monetary award.

Rule 1. Amateurism

Definitions
An amateur golfer is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative and non-profit-making sport and who does not receive remuneration for teaching golf or for other activities because of golf skill or reputation, except as provided in the Rules. The term Rule or Rules refers to the Rules of Amateur Status as determined by the Governing Body.

1-1. General
An amateur golfer must play the game and conduct himself in accordance with the Rules.

1-2. Amateur Status
Amateur status is a universal condition of eligibility for playing golf competitions as an Amateur golfer. A person who acts contrary to the Rules may forfeit his status as an amateur golfer and as a result will be ineligible to play in amateur competitions.

1-3. Purpose and Spirit of the Rules
The purpose and spirit of the Rules is to maintain the distinction between Amateur golf and Professional golf and keep the Amateur game as free as possible from the abuses which may follow from uncontrolled sponsorship and financial incentive. It is considered necessary to safeguard Amateur golf, which is largely self-regulating with regard to the Rules of play and handicapping, so that it may be fully enjoyed by all Amateur golfers.

1-4. Doubt as to Rules
Any person who wishes to be an Amateur golfer and who is in doubt as to whether taking a proposed course of action is permitted under the Rules should consult the Governing Body. Any organiser or sponsor of an Amateur golf competition or a competition involving Amateur golfers, who is in doubt as to whether a proposal is in accordance with the Rules should consult the Governing Body.

Rule 2. Professionalism

2-1. General
An amateur golfer must not take any action for the purpose of becoming a Professional golfer, including entering into an agreement, written or oral, with a sponsor or Professional agent.
Exception: Applying unsuccessfully for the position of assistant professional.
Note: An Amateur golfer may enquire as to his likely prospects as a Professional and he may work in a Professional's shop and receive a salary, provided he does not infringe the Rules in any way.

2-2. Professional Golfers Organization
An amateur golfer must not hold or retain membership of any Professional Golfers' Association.

2-3. Professional Tournament Players
An Amateur golfer must not file an application to a final or sole qualifying competition for a Professional Tour.
Note: If an Amateur golfer must pre-qualify for a final qualifying competition, he may enter such a pre-qualifying competition without forfeiting his Amateur status.

Rule 3. Prizes

Definitions
The Governing Body for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union for that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews is the Governing Body.

A prize voucher is a voucher issued by the Committee in charge of a competition for the purchase of goods from a Professional's shop or other retail source.

The retail value of a prize is the normal recommended selling price at which merchandise is available to anyone at a retail source.

A symbolic prize is a trophy made of gold, silver, ceramic, glass or the like which is permanently and distinctively engraved.

A testimonial award relates to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from competition prizes. A testimonial award may not be a monetary award.

3-1. Playing for Prize Money
An Amateur golfer must not play golf for prize money.

3-2. Prize Limits
a. General

An amateur golfer must not accept a prize (other than a symbolic prize) or prize voucher of retail value in excess of the prescribed limits. These limits apply to the total prizes or prize vouchers received by an Amateur golfer in any one competition or series of competitions, excluding any hole-in-one prize.
In Europe    300         or the equivalent
Elsewhere    $US500   or the equivalent
or such lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body.

b. Hole-in-One Prizes
The limits prescribed in Rule 3-2a applies to a prize for a hole-in-one. However, such a prize may be accepted in addition to any other prize won in the same competition.

c. Exchanging prizes
An Amateur golfer must not exchange a prize or prize voucher for cash.
Exception: An Amateur golfer may submit a prize voucher to a national or county union and thereafter be reimbursed from the value of that voucher for expenses incurred in participating in a golf competition, provided the reimbursement of such expenses is permitted under Rule 4-2.
Note 1: The onus of proving the retail value of a particular prize rests with the Committee in charge of the competition.
Note 2: It is recommended that the total value of scratch prizes, or each division of handicap prizes, should not exceed twice the prescribed limit in an 18-hole competition, three times in a 36-hole competition, four times in a 54-hole competition and five times in a 72-hole competition.

3-3. Testimonial Awards
a. General

An Amateur golfer must not accept a testimonial award of retail value in excess of the limits prescribed in Rule 3-2a.

b. Multiple Awards
An Amateur golfer may accept more than one testimonial award from different donors, even though their total retail value exceeds the prescribed limit, provided they are not presented so as to evade the limit for a single award.

Rule 4. Expenses

Definitions
The Governing Body for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union for that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews is the Governing Body.

A junior golfer is an Amateur golfer who has not yet reached his 18th birthday in the year prior to the event, unless a different age is decided by the Governing Body.

4-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer must not accept expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to play in a golf competition or exhibition.

4-2. Receipt of Expenses
An amateur golfer may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, to play in a golf competition or exhibition as follows:
a. Family Support
An amateur golfer may receive expenses from a member of his family or a legal guardian.

b. Junior Golfers
A junior golfer may accept expenses when competing in a competition limited exclusively to junior golfers.

c. Team Events
(i)
An amateur golfer, who is representing his country, county or club (or similar body) in a team competition or at a training camp may receive expenses; and
(ii) An Amateur golfer, who is representing his country by taking part in a national championship abroad immediately before or after an international team competition may receive expenses.
The expenses must be paid by the body he represents or the body controlling golf in the country in the country he is visiting.

d. Individual Events
An Amateur golfer may receive expenses when competing in individual events provided he complies with the following provisions:
(i) The player must be nominated to play in the competition by either his club, county or national union.
(ii) Where the competition is to take place in the player's own country and the nomination has been made by a club or county union, the approval of the national union, or the county union in the area in which the competition is to be staged, must first be obtained.
(iii) Where the competition is to take place in another country, the approval of the national union of the country in which the competition is to be staged and, if the nominating body is not the national union of the country from which the nomination is made, the approval of the national union must first be obtained by the nominating body.
(iv) The expenses must be paid only by the national union or county union responsible in the area from which the nomination is made or, subject to the approval of the nominating body, by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting.
(v) The expenses must be limited to a specific number of competitive days in any one calendar year as may be determined by the governing body in the country from which the nomination was made. The expenses are deemed to include reasonable travelling time and practice days in connection with the competitive days.

Celebrities, Business Associates, etc.
An Amateur golfer who is invited to take part in a competition for reasons unrelated to golf skill may receive expenses.

f. Exhibitions
An Amateur golfer who is participating in an exhibition in aid of a recognised charity may receive expenses, provided that the exhibition is not run in connection with another golfing event.

g. Sponsored Handicap Competitions
An Amateur golfer may receive expenses when competing in a sponsored handicap competition, provided the competition has been approved as follows:
(i)Where the competition is to take place in the player's own country, the annual approval of the Governing body must first be obtained in advance by the sponsor; and
(ii) Where the competition is to take place in more than one country, or involves golfers from another country, the approval of the two or more Governing bodies must first be obtained in advance by the sponsor. The application for this approval should be sent to the Governing body in the country where the competition commences.

Rule 5. Instruction

Definitions
Instruction covers teaching the physical aspects of playing golf, i.e., the actual mechanics of swinging a golf club and hitting a golf ball.

A junior golfer is an Amateur golfer who has not yet reached his 18th birthday in the year prior to the event, unless a different age is decided by the Governing Body.

5-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer must not receive payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf.

5-2. Where Payment Permitted
a. Schools, Colleges, etc.

An Amateur golfer, who is an employee of an educational institution or system, may receive payment or compensation for golf instruction to students of the institution or system, provided that during a year the total time devoted to golf instruction comprises less than 50 percent of the time spent in the performance of all duties as such an employee.

b. Junior Golfers
An Amateur golfer may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, for giving golf instruction to junior golfers as part of a programme which has been approved in advance by the Governing Body.

5-3. Instruction in Writing
An Amateur golfer may receive payment or compensation for instruction in writing, provided his ability or reputation as a golfer was not a major factor in his employment or in the commission or sale of his work.
Note: Instruction does not cover the many psychological aspects of the game or the Rules or Etiquette of Golf.

Rule 6. Use of Golf Skill or Reputation

Definitions
Generally, an Amateur golfer is only considered to have golf skill if he has gained representative honours at county or national level. Golf reputation can only be gained through golf skill and does not include prominence for service to the game of golf as an administrator. It is a matter for the Governing Body to decide whether a particular Amateur golfer has golf skill or reputation.

The Governing Body for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union for that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews is the Governing Body.

Instruction covers the physical aspects of playing golf, i.e. the actual mechanics of swinging a golf club and hitting a golf ball.

6-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to promote, advertise or sell anything or for any financial gain.

6-2. Lending Name or Likeness
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain, directly or indirectly, for allowing his name or likeness to be used for the advertisement or sale of anything.
Note: An amateur golfer may accept equipment from anyone dealing in such equipment provided no advertising is involved.

6-3. Personal Appearance
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain, directly or indirectly, for a personal appearance.
Exception: An Amateur golfer may receive actual expenses in connection with a personal appearance provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.

6-4. Broadcasting and Writing
An Amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain, directly or indirectly, for broadcasting concerning golf, or writing golf articles or books.
Exception: An Amateur golfer may receive payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain from broadcasting or writing provided:
(a) the player is actually the author of the commentary, articles or books; and
(b) instruction in playing golf is not included.

6-5. Grants, Scholarships and Bursaries
An Amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not accept the benefits of a grant, scholarship or bursary, except one whose terms and conditions have been approved by the Governing body.

6-6. Membership
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not accept an offer of membership in a Golf Club without full payment for the class of membership if such an offer is made as an inducement to play for that Club.

Rule 7. Other Conduct Incompatible with Amateurism

Definitions
An Amateur golfer is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative and non-profit-making sport and who does not receive remuneration for teaching golf or for other activities because of golf skill or reputation, except as provided in the Rules.

The term Rule or Rules refers to the Rules of Amateur Status as determined by the Governing body.

7-1. Conduct Detrimental to golf
An Amateur golfer must not act in a manner which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the game.

7-2. Conduct Contrary to the Purpose and Spirit of the Rules
An Amateur golfer must not take any action, including actions relating to golf gambling, which is contrary to the purpose and spirit of the Rules.

Rule 8. Procedure for Enforcement of the Rules

Definitions
The Committee is the appropriate Committee of the Governing body.

The Governing Body for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union for that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews is the Governing Body.

8-1. Decision on a Breach
If a possible breach of the Rules by a person claiming to be an Amateur golfer comes to the attention of the Committee, it is a matter for the Committee to decide whether a breach has occurred. Each case will be investigated to the extent deemed appropriate by the Committee and considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final, subject to an appeal as provided in these Rules.

8-2. Enforcement
Upon a decision that a person has breached the Rules, the Committee may declare the Amateur status of the person forfeited or require the person to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his Amateur status.
The Committee must use its best endeavours to ensure that the person is notified and may notify any interested golf union of any action taken under Rule 8-2.

8-3. Appeals Procedure
A person affected by a decision made by the Amateur Status Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews in respect of the enforcement of these Rules, may raise an appeal of that decision with the Amateur Status Appeals Committee.
Note: Each Governing body should put in place a procedure whereby any decision in respect of forfeiture of Amateur Status may be appealed by the person affected by such decision.

Rule 9. Reinstatement of Amateur Status

Definitions
The Committee is the appropriate Committee of the Governing body.

The Governing Body for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union for that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews is the Governing Body.

9-1. General
The Committee has sole power to reinstate a person to Amateur status or to deny reinstatement, subject to an Appeal as provided in these Rules. Each application for reinstatement shall be considered on its merits.

9-2. Applications for Reinstatement
In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:
a. Awaiting Reinstatement
The Professional is considered to hold an advantage over the Amateur golfer by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons infringing the Rules also gain advantages not available to the Amateur golfer. They do not necessarily lose such advantages merely by deciding to cease infringing the Rules. Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur status must undergo a period awaiting reinstatement as prescribed by the Committee.
The period awaiting reinstatement starts from the date of the person's last breach of the Rules unless the Committee decides that it starts from the date when the person's last breach became known to the Committee.

b. Period Awaiting Reinstatement
(i) Professionalism

The period awaiting reinstatement is normally related to the period the person was in breach. however, no applicant is normally eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Rules for a period of at least one year.
It is recommended that the following guidelines on periods awaiting reinstatement are applied by the Committee:
Period of Breach: Period Awaiting Reinstatement
under 2 years 1 year
2-10 years 2 years
over 10 years 3 years

The Committee reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period. Players of national prominence who have been in breach for more than five years are not normally eligible for reinstatement.

(ii) Other Breaches of the Rules
The period awaiting reinstatement is normally related to the seriousness of the breach, i.e. the value of the excessive prize, the amount of unauthorised expenses received, etc. However, no applicant is normally eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Rules for a period of at least two years. The Committee reserves the right to extend or shorten such a period.

(iii) Second Reinstatement
The period awaiting reinstatement is normally three years irrespective of the period of breach.
The Committee reserves the right to extend or shorten such a period.

c. Number of Reinstatements
A person is not normally reinstated more than twice.

d. Status While Awaiting Reinstatement
During the period awaiting reinstatement an applicant for reinstatement must comply with these Rules as they apply to an Amateur golfer.
He is not eligible to enter competitions as an Amateur golfer. however, he may enter competitions and win a prize solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club; but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.

9-3 Procedure for Applications
Each application for reinstatement must be submitted to the Committee, in accordance with such procedures as may be laid down and it must include such information as the Committee may require.

9-4 Appeals Procedure
A person affected by a decision made by the Amateur Status Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews in respect of reinstatement of Amateur Status, may raise an appeal of that decision with the Amateur Status Appeals Committee.
Note: Each Governing body should put in place a procedure whereby any decision in respect of reinstatement of Amateur Status may be appealed by the person affected by such a decision.

Rule 10. Committee Decision

Definition
The Committee is the appropriate Committee of the Governing body.

10-1. Committee's Decision
The Committee's decision is final, subject to an appeal as provided in Rules 8-3 and 9-4.

10-2. Doubt as to Rules
If the Committee considers the case to be doubtful or not covered by the Rules, it may, prior to making its decision, consult with the Amateur Status Committee of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews.





2004

Preamble
The R&A reserves the right to change the Rules and to make and change the interpretations relating to Amateur Status at any time.
In the Rules of Amateur Status, the gender used in relation to any person is understoood to include both genders.

DEFINITIONS

The Definitions are listed alphabetically and, in the Rules themselves, defined terms are in italics.

Amateur Golfer
An "Amateur golfer" is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative and non-profit-making sport and who does not receive remuneration for teaching golf or for other activities because of golf skill or reputation, except as provided in the Rules.

Committee
The "Committee" is the appropriate Committee of the Governing body.

Golf Skill or Reputation
Generally, an Amateur golfer is only considered to have golf skill if he has gained representative honours at county or national level. Golf reputation can only be gained through golf skill and does not include prominence for service to the game of golf as an administrator. It is a matter for a governing body to decide whether a particular amateur golfer has "golf skill or reputation".

Governing Body
The "Governing Body" for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union of that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the R&A is the Governing Body.

Instruction
"Instruction" covers teaching the physical aspects of playing golf, i.e. the actual mechanics of swinging a golf club and hitting a golf ball.

Junior Golfer
A "junior golfer" is an Amateur golfer who has not yet reached his 18th birthday in the year prior to the event, unless a different age is decided by the Governing Body.

Prize Voucher
A "prize voucher" is a voucher issued by the Committee in charge of a competition for the purchase of goods from a Professional's shop or other retail source.

R&A
The R&A means R&A Rules Limited.

Retail Value
The "retail value" of a prize is the normal recommended selling price at which merchandise is available to anyone at a retail source.

Rule or Rules
The term "Rule" or "Rules" refers to the Rules of Amateur Status as determined by the Governing Body.

Symbolic Prize
A "symbolic prize" is a trophy made of gold, silver, ceramic, glass or the like which is permanently and distinctively engraved.

Testimonial Award
A "testimonial award" relates to notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from competition prizes. A testimonial award may not be a monetary award.

Rule 1. Amateurism

Definitions
All defined terms are in italics and are listed alphabetically in the Definitions section.

1-1. General
An Amateur Golfer must play the game and conduct himself in accordance with the Rules.

1-2. Amateur Status
Amateur status is a universal condition of eligibility for playing golf competitions as an Amateur golfer. A person who acts contrary to the Rules may forfeit his status as an amateur golfer and as a result will be ineligible to play in amateur competitions.

1-3. Purpose and Spirit of the Rules
The purpose and spirit of the Rules is to maintain the distinction between Amateur golf and Professional golf and keep the Amateur game as free as possible from the abuses which may follow from uncontrolled sponsorship and financial incentive. It is considered necessary to safeguard Amateur golf, which is largely self-regulating with regard to the Rules of play and handicapping, so that it may be fully enjoyed by all Amateur golfers.

1-4. Doubt as to Rules
Any person who wishes to be an Amateur golfer and who is in doubt as to whether taking a proposed course of action is permitted under the Rules should consult the Governing Body. Any organiser or sponsor of an Amateur golf competition or a competition involving Amateur golfers, who is in doubt as to whether a proposal is in accordance with the Rules should consult the Governing Body.

Rule 2. Professionalism

2-1. General
An Amateur golfer must not take any action for the purpose of becoming a Professional golfer, including entering into an agreement, written or oral, with a sponsor or Professional agent.
Exception: Applying unsuccessfully for the position of assistant professional.
Note: An Amateur golfer may enquire as to his likely prospects as a Professional and he may work in a Professional's shop and receive a salary, provided he does not infringe the Rules in any way.

2-2. Professional Golfers' Organization
An Amateur golfer must not hold or retain membership of any Professional Golfers' Association.

2-3. Professional Tournament Players
An Amateur golfer must not hold or retain membership of a Professional Tour.
Note: If an Amateur golfer must compete in one or more qualifying competitions in order to be eligible for membership of a Professional Tour, he may enter and play in such qualifying competitions without forfeiting his Amateur Status, provided, in advance of play and in writing, he waives his right to any prize money in the competition.

Rule 3. Prizes

3-1. Playing for Prize Money
An Amateur golfer must not play golf for prize money.

3-2. Prize Limits
a. General

An Amateur golfer must not accept a prize (other than a symbolic prize) or prize voucher of retail value in excess of 500 or the equivalent, or such a lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body. This limit applies to the total prizes or prize vouchers received by an Amateur golfer in any one competition or series of competitions, excluding any hole-in-one prize.

b. Hole-in-One Prizes
The limits prescribed in Rule 3-2a applies to a prize for a hole-in-one. However, such a prize may be accepted in addition to any other prize won in the same competition.

c. Exchanging prizes
An Amateur golfer must not exchange a prize or prize voucher for cash.
Exception: An Amateur golfer may submit a prize voucher to a national or county union and thereafter be reimbursed from the value of that voucher for expenses incurred in participating in a golf competition, provided the reimbursement of such expenses is permitted under Rule 4-2.
Note 1: The onus of proving the retail value of a particular prize rests with the Committee in charge of the competition.
Note 2: It is recommended that the total value of scratch prizes, or each division of handicap prizes, should not exceed twice the prescribed limit in an 18-hole competition, three times in a 36-hole competition, five times in a 54-hole competition and six times in a 72-hole competition.

3-3. Testimonial Awards
a. General

An Amateur golfer must not accept a testimonial award of retail value in excess of the limits prescribed in Rule 3-2a.

b. Multiple Awards
An Amateur golfer may accept more than one testimonial award from different donors, even though their total retail value exceeds the prescribed limit, provided they are not presented so as to evade the limit for a single award.

Rule 4. Expenses

4-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an Amateur golfer must not accept expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to play in a golf competition or exhibition.

4-2. Receipt of Expenses
An amateur golfer may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, to play in a golf competition or exhibition as follows:

a. Family Support
An amateur golfer may receive expenses from a member of his family or a legal guardian.

b. Junior Golfers
A junior golfer may accept expenses when competing in a competition limited exclusively to junior golfers.

c. Team Events
(i)
An amateur golfer, who is representing his country, county or club (or similar body) in a team competition or at a training camp may receive expenses; and
(ii) An Amateur golfer, who is representing his country by taking part in a national championship abroad immediately before or after an international team competition may receive expenses.
The expenses must be paid by the body he represents or the body controlling golf in the country in the country he is visiting.

d. Individual Events
An Amateur golfer may receive expenses when competing in individual events provided he complies with the following provisions:
(i) The player must be nominated to play in the competition by either his club, county or national union.
(ii) Where the competition is to take place in the player's own country and the nomination has been made by a club or county union, the approval of the national union, or the county union in the area in which the competition is to be staged, must first be obtained.
(iii) Where the competition is to take place in another country, the approval of the national union of the country in which the competition is to be staged and, if the nominating body is not the national union of the country from which the nomination is made, the approval of the national union must first be obtained by the nominating body.
(iv) The expenses must be paid only by the national union or county union responsible in the area from which the nomination is made or, subject to the approval of the nominating body, by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting.
(v) The expenses must be limited to a specific number of competitive days in any one calendar year as may be determined by the governing body in the country from which the nomination is made. The expenses are deemed to include reasonable travelling time and practice days in connection with the competitive days.

Celebrities, Business Associates, etc.
An Amateur golfer who is invited to take part in a competition for reasons unrelated to golf skill may receive expenses.

f. Exhibitions
An Amateur golfer who is participating in an exhibition in aid of a recognised charity may receive expenses, provided that the exhibition is not run in connection with another golfing event.

g. Sponsored Handicap Competitions
An Amateur golfer may receive expenses when competing in a sponsored handicap competition, provided the competition has been approved as follows:
(i)Where the competition is to take place in the player's own country, the annual approval of the Governing body must first be obtained in advance by the sponsor; and
(ii) Where the competition is to take place in more than one country, or involves golfers from another country, the approval of the two or more Governing bodies must first be obtained in advance by the sponsor. The application for this approval should be sent to the Governing body in the country where the competition commences.

Rule 5. Instruction

5-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer must not receive payment or compensation for giving instruction in playing golf.

5-2. Where Payment Permitted
a. Schools, Colleges, etc.

An Amateur golfer, who is an employee of an educational institution or system, may receive payment or compensation for golf instruction to students of the institution or system, provided that during a year the total time devoted to golf instruction comprises less than 50 percent of the time spent in the performance of all duties as such an employee.

b. Junior Golfers
An Amateur golfer may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, for giving golf instruction to junior golfers as part of a programme which has been approved in advance by the Governing Body.

5-3. Instruction in Writing
An Amateur golfer may receive payment or compensation for instruction in writing, provided his ability or reputation as a golfer was not a major factor in his employment or in the commission or sale of his work.
Note: Instruction does not cover the many psychological aspects of the game or the Rules or Etiquette of Golf.

Rule 6. Use of Golf Skill or Reputation

6-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to promote, advertise or sell anything or for any financial gain.

6-2. Lending Name or Likeness
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain for allowing his name or likeness to be used for the advertisement or sale of anything.
Note: An amateur golfer may accept equipment from anyone dealing in such equipment provided no advertising is involved.

6-3. Personal Appearance
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain for a personal appearance.
Exception: An Amateur golfer may receive actual expenses in connection with a personal appearance provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.

6-4. Broadcasting and Writing
An Amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain for broadcasting concerning golf, or writing golf articles or books.
Exception: An Amateur golfer may receive payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain from broadcasting or writing provided:
(a) the player is actually the author of the commentary, articles or books; and
(b) instruction in playing golf is not included.

6-5. Grants, Scholarships and Bursaries
An Amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not accept the benefits of a grant, scholarship or bursary, except one whose terms and conditions have been approved by the Governing body.

6-6. Membership
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not accept an offer of membership in a Golf Club without full payment for the class of membership if such an offer is made as an inducement to play for that Club.

Rule 7. Other Conduct Incompatible with Amateurism

7-1. Conduct Detrimental to Amateurism
An Amateur golfer must not act in a manner which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the Amateur game.

7-2. Conduct Contrary to the Purpose and Spirit of the Rules
An Amateur golfer must not take any action, including actions relating to golf gambling, which is contrary to the purpose and spirit of the Rules.

Rule 8. Procedure for Enforcement of the Rules

8-1. Decision on a Breach
If a possible breach of the Rules by a person claiming to be an Amateur golfer comes to the attention of the Committee, it is a matter for the Committee to decide whether a breach has occurred. Each case will be investigated to the extent deemed appropriate by the Committee and considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final, subject to an appeal as provided in these Rules.

8-2. Enforcement
Upon a decision that a person has breached the Rules, the Committee may declare the Amateur status of the person forfeited or require the person to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his Amateur status.
The Committee must use its best endeavours to ensure that the person is notified and may notify any interested golf union of any action taken under Rule 8-2.

8-3. Appeals Procedure
Each Governing Body should put in place a procedure whereby any decision in respect of enforcement of these Rules may be appealed by the person affected by such decision.
Note: If a person whose Governing body is the R&A, is affected by a decision made by the Amateur Status Committee of the R&A in respect of the enforcement of these Rules, that person may raise an appeal of that decision with the Amateur Status Appeals Committee of the R&A.

Rule 9. Reinstatement of Amateur Status

9-1. General
The Committee has sole power to reinstate a person to Amateur status or to deny reinstatement, subject to an Appeal as provided in these Rules. Each application for reinstatement shall be considered on its merits.

9-2. Applications for Reinstatement
In considering an application for reinstatement, the Committee shall normally be guided by the following principles:

a. Awaiting Reinstatement
The Professional is considered to hold an advantage over the Amateur golfer by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons infringing the Rules also gain advantages not available to the Amateur golfer. They do not necessarily lose such advantages merely by deciding to cease infringing the Rules. Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur status must undergo a period awaiting reinstatement as prescribed by the Committee.
The period awaiting reinstatement starts from the date of the person's last breach of the Rules unless the Committee decides that it starts from the date when the person's last breach became known to the Committee.

b. Period Awaiting Reinstatement
(i) Professionalism

The period awaiting reinstatement is normally related to the period the person was in breach. However, no applicant is normally eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Rules for a period of at least one year.
It is recommended that the following guidelines on periods awaiting reinstatement are applied by the Committee:
Period of Breach: Period Awaiting Reinstatement
under 5 years 1 year
5 years or more 2 years

The Committee reserves the right to extend or to shorten such a period. Players of national prominence who have been in breach for more than five years are not normally eligible for reinstatement.

(ii) Other Breaches of the Rules
The period awaiting reinstatement is normally related to the seriousness of the breach, i.e. the value of the excessive prize, the amount of unauthorised expenses received, etc. However, no applicant is normally eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Rules for a period of at least one year. It is recommended that the Committee extends the period awaiting reinstatement as the seriousness of the breach increases, with a period of up to five years applied for the most serious cases.
The Committee reserves the right to extend or shorten such a period.

c. Number of Reinstatements
A person is not normally reinstated more than twice.

d. Status While Awaiting Reinstatement
During the period awaiting reinstatement an applicant for reinstatement must comply with these Rules as they apply to an Amateur golfer.
He is not eligible to enter competitions as an Amateur golfer. However, he may enter competitions and win a prize solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club; but he may not represent such Club against other Clubs.

9-3 Procedure for Applications
Each application for reinstatement must be submitted to the Committee, in accordance with such procedures as may be laid down and it must include such information as the Committee may require.

9-4 Appeals Procedure
Each Governing body should put in place a procedure whereby any decision in respect of reinstatement of Amateur Status may be appealed by the person affected by such a decision.
Note: If a person whose Governing body is the R&A, is affected by a decision made by the Amateur Status Committee of the R&A in respect of reinstatement of Amateur Status, that person may raise an appeal of that decision with the Amateur Status Appeals Committee of the R&A.

Rule 10. Committee Decision

10-1. Committee's Decision
The Committee's decision is final, subject to an appeal as provided in Rules 8-3 and 9-4.

10-2. Doubt as to Rules
If the Committee considers the case to be doubtful or not covered by the Rules, it may, prior to making its decision, consult with the Amateur Status Committee of the R&A.





2008

Preamble
The R&A reserves the right to change the Rules and to make and change the interpretations relating to Amateur Status at any time.
In the Rules of Amateur Status, the gender used in relation to any person is understoood to include both genders.

DEFINITIONS

The Definitions are listed alphabetically and, in the Rules themselves, defined terms are in italics.

Amateur Golfer
An "amateur golfer" is one who plays the game as a non-remunerative and non-profit-making sport and who does not receive remuneration for teaching golf or for other activities because of golf skill or reputation, except as provided in the Rules.

Committee
The "Committee" is the appropriate Committee of the Governing body.
Note: In great britain and Ireland, the Committee is the Amateur Status Committee of the R&A

Golf Skill or Reputation
It is a matter for a governing body to decide whether a particular amateur golfer has "golf skill or reputation". Generally, an amateur golfer is only considered to have golf skill if he:
(a) has had competitive success at a local or national level or has been selected to represent his nation, region, state or county union or assiciation; or
(b) competes at an elite level.
Golf reputation can only be gained through golf skill and does not include prominence for service to the game of golf as an administrator.

Governing Body
The "Governing Body" for the Rules of Amateur Status in any country is the national union of that country.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, the R&A is the Governing Body.

Instruction
"Instruction" covers teaching the physical aspects of playing golf, i.e. the actual mechanics of swinging a golf club and hitting a golf ball.
Note: Instruction does not cover teaching the psychological aspects of the game or the etiquette or Rules of Golf.

Junior Golfer
A "junior golfer" is an amateur golfer who has not reached a specified age as determined by the Governing Body.
Note: In Great Britain and Ireland, a junior golfer is an amateur golfer who has not reached his 18th birthday in the year prior to the event.

Prize Voucher
A "prize voucher" is a voucher or gift certificate issued by the Committee in charge of a competition for the purchase of goods from a Professional's shop or other retail source.

R&A
The R&A means R&A Rules Limited.

Retail Value
The "retail value" of a prize is the price at which the prize is generally available from a retail source at the time of the award.

Rule or Rules
The term "Rule" or "Rules" refers to the Rules of Amateur Status as determined by the Governing Body.

Symbolic Prize
A "symbolic prize" is a trophy made of gold, silver, ceramic, glass or the like which is permanently and distinctively engraved.

Testimonial Award
A "testimonial award" is an award for notable performances or contributions to golf as distinguished from competition prizes. A testimonial award may not be a monetary award.

Rule 1. Amateurism

Definitions
All defined terms are in italics and are listed alphabetically in the Definitions section.

1-1. General
An amateur golfer must play the game and conduct himself in accordance with the Rules.

1-2. Amateur Status
Amateur status is a universal condition of eligibility for playing golf competitions as an amateur golfer. A person who acts contrary to the Rules may forfeit his status as an amateur golfer and as a result will be ineligible to play in amateur competitions.

1-3. Purpose and Spirit of the Rules
The purpose and spirit of the Rules is to maintain the distinction between amateur golf and professional golf and to keep the amateur game as free as possible from the abuses which may follow from uncontrolled sponsorship and financial incentive. It is considered necessary to safeguard amateur golf, which is largely self-regulating with regard to the Rules of play and handicapping, so that it may be fully enjoyed by all amateur golfers.

1-4. Doubt as to Rules
Any person who wishes to be an amateur golfer and who is in doubt as to whether taking a proposed course of action is permitted under the Rules should consult the Governing Body. Any organiser or sponsor of an amateur golf competition or a competition involving amateur golfers, who is in doubt as to whether a proposal is in accordance with the Rules should consult the Governing Body.

Rule 2. Professionalism

2-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer must not take any action for the purpose of becoming a professional golfer and must not idetify himself as a professional golfer.
Note 1: Actions by an amateur golfer for the purpose of becoming a professional golfer include, but are not limited to:
(a) accepting the position of a professional golfer;
(b) receiving services or payment, directly or indirectly, from a professional agent;
(c) entering into a written or oral agreement, directly or indirectly, with a professional agent or sponsor; and
(d) agreeing to accept payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for allowing his name or likeness as a player of golf skill or reputation to be used for any commercial purpose.
Note 2: An amateur golfer may enquire as to his likely prospects as a professional golfer, including applying unsuccessfully for the position of a professional golfer, and he may work in a professional's shop and receive payment or compensation, provided he does not infringe the Rules in any other way.

2-2. Membership of Professional Golfers' Organizations
a. Professional Golfers' Association

An amateur golfer must not hold or retain membership of any Professional Golfers' Association.

b. Professional Tours
An amateur golfer must not hold or retain membership of a Professional Tour limited exclusively to professional golfers.
Note: If an amateur golfer must compete in one or more qualifying competitions in order to be eligible for membership of a Professional Tour, he may enter and play in such qualifying competitions without forfeiting his Amateur Status, provided, in advance of play and in writing, he waives his right to any prize money in the competition.

Rule 3. Prizes

3-1. Playing for Prize Money
An Amateur golfer must not play golf for prize money or its equivalent in a match, competition or exhibition.
Note: An amateur golfer may participate in an event where prize money or its equivalent is offered, provided that prior to participation he waives his right to any prize money in that event.
(Conduct contrary to the purpose and spirit of the Rules - see Rule 7-2)
(Policy on gambling - See Appendix)

3-2. Prize Limits
a. General

An amateur golfer must not accept a prize (other than a symbolic prize) or prize voucher of retail value in excess of 500 or the equivalent, or such a lesser figure as may be decided by the Governing Body. This limit applies to the total prizes or prize vouchers received by an amateur golfer in any one competition or series of competitions, excluding any hole-in-one prize (see Rule 3-2b).

b. Hole-in-One Prizes
The limits prescribed in Rule 3-2a applies to a prize for a hole-in-one. However, such a prize may be accepted in addition to any other prize won in the same competition.

c. Exchanging prizes
An amateur golfer must not exchange a prize or prize voucher for cash.
Exception: An amateur golfer may submit a prize voucher to a national, regional, state or county union or association and thereafter be reimbursed from the value of that voucher for expenses incurred in participating in a golf competition, provided the reimbursement of such expenses is permitted under Rule 4-2.
Note 1: The responsibility to prove the retail value of a particular prize rests with the Committee in charge of the competition.
Note 2: It is recommended that the total value of prizes in a gross competition, or each division of a handicap competition, should not exceed twice the prescribed limit in an 18-hole competition, three times in a 36-hole competition, five times in a 54-hole competition and six times in a 72-hole competition.

3-3. Testimonial Awards
a. General

An amateur golfer must not accept a testimonial award of retail value in excess of the limits prescribed in Rule 3-2a.

b. Multiple Awards
An amateur golfer may accept more than one testimonial award from different donors, even though their total retail value exceeds the prescribed limit, provided they are not presented so as to evade the limit for a single award.

Rule 4. Expenses

4-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer must not accept expenses, in money or otherwise, from any source to play in a golf competition or exhibition.

4-2. Receipt of Expenses
An amateur golfer may receive expenses, not exceeding the actual expenses incurred, to play in a golf competition or exhibition as follows:

a. Family Support
An amateur golfer may receive expenses from a member of his family or a legal guardian.

b. Junior Golfers
A junior golfer may receive expenses when competing in a competition limited exclusively to junior golfers.

c. Individual Events
An amateur golfer may receive expenses when competing in individual events provided he complies with the following provisions:
(i) Where the competition is to take place in the player's own country the expenses must be approved by and paid through the player's national, regional, state or county union or association.
(ii) Where the competition is to take place in another country the expenses must be approved by both the player's national union or association and the national union or association in the country in which the competition is to be staged. The expenses must be paid through the player's national, regional, state or county union or association or, subject to the approval of the player's national union or association, by the body controlling golf in the territory he is visiting.

The Governing Body may limit the receipt of expenses to a specific number of competitive days in any one calendar year and an amateur golfer must not exceed any such limit. In such a case, the expenses are deemed to include reasonable travel time and practice days in connection with the competitive days.
Exception: An amateur golfer must not receive expenses, directly or indirectly, from a professional agent (see Rule 2-1) or any similar source as may be determined by the Governing Body.
Note: An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not promote or advertise the source of any expenses received (see Rule 6-2).

d. Team Events
(i)
An amateur golfer, may receive expenses when he is representing:
•  his country,
•  his region, state, or county union or association,
•  his golf club,
•  his business or industry, or
•  a similar body
in a team competition, practice session or training camp.
Note: A "similar body" includes a recognised educational institution or military service.
Note 2: Unless otherwise stated, the expenses must be paid by the body that the amateur golfer is representing or the body controlling golf in the country he is visiting.

e. Invitation Unrelated to Golf Skill
An amateur golfer who is invited for reasons unrelated to golf skill (e.g. a celebrity, a business associate or customer) to take part in a golf event may receive expenses.

f. Exhibitions
An amateur golfer who is participating in an exhibition in aid of a recognised charity may receive expenses, provided that the exhibition is not run in connection with another golfing event in which the player is competing.

g. Sponsored Handicap Competitions
An amateur golfer may receive expenses when competing in a sponsored handicap competition, provided the competition has been approved as follows:
(i) Where the competition is to take place in the player's own country, the annual approval of the Governing Body must first be obtained in advance by the sponsor; and
(ii) Where the competition is to take place in more than one country, or involves golfers from another country, the approval of each Governing Body must first be obtained in advance by the sponsor. The application for this approval should be sent to the Governing Body in the country where the competition commences.

Rule 5. Instruction

5-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer must not receive payment or compensation, directly or indirectly, for giving instruction in playing golf.

5-2. Where Payment Permitted
a. Schools, Colleges, Camps, etc.

An amateur golfer, who is (i) an employee of an educational institution or system or (ii) a counsellor at a camp or other similar organised programme, may receive payment or compensation for golf instruction to students in the institution, system or camp, provided that the total time devoted to golf instruction comprises less than 50 percent of the time spent in the performance of all duties as such an employee or counsellor.

b. Approved Programmes
An amateur golfer may receive expenses, payment or compensation for giving golf instruction as part of a programme which has been approved in advance by the Governing Body.

5-3. Instruction in Writing
An amateur golfer may receive payment or compensation for golf instruction in writing, provided his ability or reputation as a golfer was not a major factor in his employment or in the commission or sale of his work.

Rule 6. Use of Golf Skill or Reputation

6-1. General
Except as provided in the Rules, an amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to promote, advertise or sell anything or for any financial gain.

6-2. Lending Name or Likeness
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain, directly or indirectly, for allowing his name or likeness to be used for the advertisement or sale of anything.
Exception: An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation may allow his name or likeness to be used to promote:
(a) his national, regional, state or county union or association, or
(b) subject to permission of his national union, (i) any golf competition or other event that is considered to be in the best interests of, or would contribute to the development of, the game or (ii) a recognised charity (or similar good cause).
The amateur golfer must not obtain any payment, compensation or financial gain, directly or indirectly, for doing so.
Note: An amateur golfer may accept equipment from anyone dealing in such equipment provided no advertising is involved.

6-3. Personal Appearance
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not use that skill or reputation to obtain payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain for a personal appearance.
Exception: An amateur golfer may receive actual expenses in connection with a personal appearance provided no golf competition or exhibition is involved.

6-4. Broadcasting and Writing
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation may receive payment, compensation, personal benefit or any financial gain from broadcasting or writing provided:
(a) the broadcasting or writing is part of his primary occupation or career and golf instruction is not included (Rule 5); or
(b) the broadcasting or writing is on a part-time basis, the player is actually the author of the commentary, articles or books and must not lend his name or likeness to the promotion or sale of the commentary, articles or books (see Rule 2).

6-5. Grants, Scholarships and Bursaries
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not accept the benefits of a grant, scholarship or bursary, except one whose terms and conditions have been approved by the Governing Body.

6-6. Membership
An amateur golfer of golf skill or reputation must not accept an offer of membership in a Golf Club or privileges at a golf course, without full payment for the class of membership or privilege, if such an offer is made as an inducement to play for that Club or course.

Rule 7. Other Conduct Incompatible with Amateurism

7-1. Conduct Detrimental to Amateurism
An amateur golfer must not act in a manner which is considered detrimental to the best interests of the Amateur game.

7-2. Conduct Contrary to the Purpose and Spirit of the Rules
An amateur golfer must not take any action, including actions relating to golf gambling, which is contrary to the purpose and spirit of the Rules.
(Policy on gambling - see Appendix)

Rule 8. Procedure for Enforcement of the Rules

8-1. Decision on a Breach
If a possible breach of the Rules by a person claiming to be an amateur golfer comes to the attention of the Committee, it is a matter for the Committee to decide whether a breach has occurred. Each case will be investigated to the extent deemed appropriate by the Committee and considered on its merits. The decision of the Committee shall be final, subject to an appeal as provided in these Rules.

8-2. Enforcement
Upon a decision that a person has breached the Rules, the Committee may declare the Amateur status of the person forfeited or require the person to refrain or desist from specified actions as a condition of retaining his Amateur status.
The Committee should notify the person and may notify any interested golf union or association of any action taken under Rule 8-2.

8-3. Appeals Procedure
Each Governing Body should establish a process or procedure through which any decision concerning enforcement of these Rules may be appealed by the person affected.
Note: If a person whose Governing Body is the R&A, is affected by a decision made by the Amateur Status Committee of the R&A in respect of the enforcement of these Rules, that person may raise an appeal of that decision with the R&A Appeals Committee.

Rule 9. Reinstatement of Amateur Status

9-1. General
The Committee has the sole authority to reinstate a person to Amateur status, prescribe a waiting period necessary for reinstatement or to deny reinstatement, subject to an Appeal as provided in these Rules.

9-2. Applications for Reinstatement
Each application for reinstatement shall be considered on its merits, with consideration normally being given to the following priciples:

a. Awaiting Reinstatement
The professional golfer is considered to hold an advantage over the amateur golfer by reason of having devoted himself to the game as his profession; other persons infringing the Rules also gain advantages not available to the amateur golfer. They do not necessarily lose such advantages merely by deciding to cease infringing the Rules. Therefore, an applicant for reinstatement to Amateur status must undergo a period awaiting reinstatement as prescribed by the Committee.
The period awaiting reinstatement starts from the date of the person's last breach of the Rules unless the Committee decides that it starts from either (a) the date when the person's last breach became known to the Committee, or (b) such other date determined by the Committee.

b. Period Awaiting Reinstatement
(i) Professionalism

Generally, the period awaiting reinstatement is related to the period the person was in breach of the Rules. However, no applicant is normally eligible for reinstatement until he has conducted himself in accordance with the Rules for a period of at least one year.
It is recommended that the following guidelines on periods awaiting reinstatement be applied by the Committee:
Period of Breach: Period Awaiting Reinstatement
under 5 years 1 year
5 years or more 2 years

However, the period may be extended if the applicant has played extensively for prize money, regardless of performance. In all cases, the Committee reserves the right to extend or to shorten such the period awaiting reinstatement.

(ii) Other Breaches of the Rules
A period awaiting reinstatement of one year will normally be required. However, the period may be extended if the breach is considered serious.

c. Number of Reinstatements
A person is not normally eligible to be reinstated more than twice.

d. Players of National Prominence
A player of national prominence who has been in breach of the Rules for more than five years is not normally eligible for reinstatement.

e. Status While Awaiting Reinstatement
An applicant for reinstatement must comply with these Rules, as they apply to an amateur golfer, during his period awaiting reinstatement.
An applicant for reinstatement is not eligible to enter competitions as an amateur golfer. However, he may enter competitions and win a prize solely among members of a Club of which he is a member, subject to the approval of the Club. He must not represent such a Club against other Clubs unless with approval of the Clubs in the competition and/or the organising Committee.
An applicant for reinstatement may enter competitions that are not limited to amateur golfers, subject to the conditions of competition, without prejudicing his application, provided he does so as an applicant for reinstatement. He must waive his right to any prize money offered in the competition and must not accept any prize reserved for an amateur golfer (Rule 3-1).

9-3 Procedure for Applications
Each application for reinstatement must be submitted to the Committee, in accordance with such procedures as may be laid down and it must include such information as the Committee may require.

9-4 Appeals Procedure
Each Governing Body should establish a process or a procedure through which any decision concerning reinstatement of Amateur Status may be appealed by the person affected.
Note: If a person whose Governing Body is the R&A, is affected by a decision made by the Amateur Status Committee of the R&A in respect of reinstatement of Amateur Status, that person may raise an appeal of that decision with the R&A Appeals Committee.

Rule 10. Committee Decision

10-1. Committee's Decision
The Committee's decision is final, subject to an appeal as provided in Rules 8-3 and 9-4.

10-2. Doubt as to Rules
If the Committee of a Governing Body, other than the R&A, considers the case to be doubtful or not covered by the Rules, it may, prior to making its decision, consult with the Amateur Status Committee of the R&A.

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